Disparities

“Unemployment Among Single Mother Families”, September, 2009.

The fact sheet shows both a high rate of unemployment among single mothers and substantial growth in their rate of unemployment since April, 2009. The fact sheet concludes suggesting that a number of changes in policy and practice are needed to improve women's earnings and the ability to combine work and family in the United States.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/pdf/SingleMotherUE_C369.pdf

Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality

Our Mission: To produce and disseminate knowledge and resources that address the impact of gender on health and well-being, promote healthy sexuality, and reduce sexual and reproductive health disparities.
 
RESEARCH: We perform rigorous, innovative research with diverse populations, link findings to practice, and evaluate the impact of evidence-based interventions.
 
EDUCATION: We offer advanced educational opportunities for undergraduate- and graduate-level students and work to implement evidence-based curricula.
 
TRAINING: We provide cutting-edge continuing education and professional development programs for educators, healthcare providers, and paraprofessionals.
 
POLICY: We link research to best practices and disseminate findings to policymakers to promote healthy sexuality.

Contact

835 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Ph. (415) 817-4525

http://cregs.sfsu.edu/



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Principal Staff

Dr. Colleen Hoff, Director
E-mail: choff@sfsu.edu

Dr. Andreana Clay, Research Faculty

Dr. Jessica Fields, Research Faculty
E-mail: jfields@sfsu.edu

Dr. Anu Manchikanti, Research Faculty

Dr. Alexis Martinez, Research Faculty

Dr. Rita Melendez, Research Faculty
E-mail: rmelende@sfsu.edu
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Summer Institute on Sexuality

Research Projects

Researchers at CREGS conduct projects examining a wide range of subjects, including sexual health, gender equality, health disparities and HIV prevention. The impact of CREGS’ work is far reaching. Our researchers consistently garner professional recognition and our work has contributed significantly to the national and international sexual research agenda.

Gender & Sexuality Seminar Series


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Reports & Resources

Click here for all articles.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
Our student internship opportunities offer academic credit for SFSU students, and position availability depends on the semester. Graduate and undergraduate students from San Francisco State University interested in involvement with CREGS should contact the Principle Investigator of the specific study the student is interested in. Visit our research projects page for a list of current CREGS research faculty and projects.
 
Volunteer Opportunities
 
CREGS is always looking for help from people interested in contributing to our work. Volunteers are always welcome. If you have an idea how you would like to work with us, feel free to send us an email.
 
 
The Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality (CREGS) is seeking thoughtful, provocative articles to feature on the front page of the CREGS website. CREGS is dedicated to producing knowledge and resources that address the impact gender on health and well-being, promote healthy sexuality, and reduce sexual and reproductive health disparities.

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Abigail Quigley McCarthy Center for Women

 The Abigail Quigley McCarthy Center for Women’s Research, Resources, and Scholarship at St. Catherine University works to build a community of faculty and student scholars and activists working on issues of race, class, gender, and other differences; gather and share resources relating to these issues; and highlight the leadership and work of women at the University and in various communities for women’s justice and equality. 

Throughout its history, the Center has been a catalyst and supporter of many projects and programs that address women’s issues, from the building of a strong Women’s Studies program to a student-directed campaign to address the concerns of student parents. The Center’s commitment to open, honest dialogue about tough issues and a belief in the necessity of work for justice form the backbone of the work we do.

Contact

2004 Randolph Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105
Ph. 651-690-6783

http://www2.stkate.edu/center-for-women/home
aqmcenterforwomen@stkate.edu


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Center News

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W
Member Organizations: 

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

New Resources on Women’s Poverty and Health

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/details.cfm?id=3732&section=child%20and%20family%20support

WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Daddy, can a man be Prime Minister?

By Gwendolyn Beetham*

When I was in graduate school in London, one of my professors told a cute story about his daughter, born during the Thatcher era, who as a small child had asked him whether a man could be Prime Minister. The point that my professor was trying to make was that having more women in positions of power does make a difference in how women’s roles are perceived by society at large.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action

By Karen O’Connor*

One need only look to the Declaration of Sentiments adopted by the women in attendance at the Seneca Falls Convention in August 1848 to begin to appreciate how far women in the United States still are from reaching equality in a host of arenas, many of which are dependent on political or legal equality. Although women were granted the franchise in 1920 after decades of struggle, it is only in the past few decades that women have become a political force – at least at the ballot box. Women not only vote more than men, but unmarried women and women of color are much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. In fact, women were key voters in the successful elections of Presidents Clinton and Obama.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Achieving Political Equality by Living It

By Tonni Brodber*

Linda Basch: From your perspective, what is the unfinished work of women’s political equality?

Tonni Brodber: In the English-speaking Caribbean women’s participation in political leadership ranges from a high of 13% in Jamaica to a low of 0% in Belize, with many countries like St. Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia hovering at 6.7% and at 5.6% respectively. In the face of such paltry numbers, it almost pains me to say that it is my belief that the unfuinished work of women’s political equality is the lack of quality and diversity.


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Center for the Education of Women

The University of Michigan Center for the Education of Women (CEW) advances the personal, educational, career, professional and leadership potential of women. The services, programs, applied research, and action initiatives conducted by CEW promote inclusiveness and equity within the University, across the state and throughout the nation.

Founded in 1964, the Center for the Education of Women, within the University of Michigan, was one of the nation's first comprehensive, university-based centers focused on women.  Designed to serve the needs of women students as well as women returning to school or work, CEW (then known as the Center for the Continuing Education of Women) was founded with a three part mission of service, advocacy, and research. CEW maintains that mission today, serving University students, staff and faculty, community members, women and men, facing educational, employment or other life issues.

Contact

330 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2274
Ph. (734) 764-6005
Fx. (734) 998-6203
http://www.cew.umich.edu
cew.mail@umich.edu
contactcew@umich.edu

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Principal Staff

Gloria Thomas, Executive Director
Ph. (734) 764-7640
E-mail: gthomas@umich.edu

Wanlanda Ault, Fianance Assistant

Kristina Bee, Development and Scholarship Assistant

Jacqueline Bowman, Senior Counselor and Program Specialist

Eilisha Dermont, Communications Manager
Ph. (734) 764-6277
E-mail: edermont@umich.edu

Kirsten Elling, Associate Director for Counseling, Programs and Services

Connie Hansen, Assistant to the Director
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Projects & Campaigns

RESEARCH

Center researchers are currently analyzing the results of the Faculty Work-Life Study, a joint project of the Center for the Education of Women and the UM Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. The survey of UM faculty included questions about climate, workload, sources of satisfaction and stress, and incorporate AAUDI questions for comparison to similar institutions.  This project also provides comparison to the 1998 FWLS.

Contingent Faculty in a Tenure Track World - CEW researchers held focus groups with full- and part-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty at twelve research universities across the country. In total, we conducted 24 ninety-minute focus groups with a total of 343 full- and part-time NTT faculty. A report of the project is available  and a video based on the project explores the responses of focus group members. The project was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The National Clearinghouse on Academic Worklife  (www.academicworklife.org) combines into a single website information resources and community discussions to support those who study or participate in academic work.  Up to date articles and policy examples are available on topics ranging from family-friendly benefits, tenure attainment, and faculty satisfaction to policy development, productivity, and demographics.  An email newsletter is also available free to subscribers. This clearinghouse was developed  through a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Dual Career Ladder Project, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, resulted in several publications based on the findings of our institutional survey of U.S. institutions of higher education.  highlighting the numbers, working conditions and perceived contributions of non tenure track faculty.  These are available on the CEW website.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

CEW’s Advanced Leadership Program offers middle management University of Michigan staff, recommended by their supervisors, an eight-month skill development workshop series and accompanying change management project.  This program has been offered annually for nearly 10 years. 

 

Focus on Leadership, addresses the need for leadership development and training for staff not yet in key middle-management positions or not yet ready for the more extensive Advanced Leadership Program.  Offered to approximately 30 individuals annually, this program offers participants an introduction to leadership concepts while it assists participants in developing an identity as a potential leader.

 

Emerging Leaders Iniative  CEW is currently developing an innovative nine-month program for emerging leaders (those with less than 6 years in their career fields) over the course of two years. The program will focus on women from a specific Michigan urban region, combining those from the private and the non-profit sectors.  The program combines in-person sessions, career coaching by senior leaders, and ongoing support and learning using web 2.0 tools including social media and online learning. 

PROGRAMS

CEW offers about 50 programs each term, covering topics such as careers, career change and job searching, work-life balance, leadership development, and focused programs for graduate students and post-docs.  In addition, CEW brings special events and speakers to the campus and community. 

In addition, CEW leads three support networks for University of Michigan women: Women of Color in the Academy Project and Junior Women Faculty Network for women faculty and the Women of Color Task Force for women staff.  These networks offer support, mentoring, and learning opportunities for participants.  The Task Force delivers a campus-wide career conference annually, with about 550 participants. 

CEW provides free counseling to students, faculty and staff of the University as well as to women and men in the community.  Each year over 1,000 adults are seen by CEW’s professional counselors.


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Reports & Resources

2012
 
"Factors Contributing to Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction among Non-Tenure-Track Faculty" By Jean Waltman, Inger Bergom, Carol Hollenshead, Jeanne Miller, and Louise August. The Journal of Higher Education, May/June 2012 83:3.  
 
Success for Nontraditional Students at Elite Institution, On Campus with Women v.40, no 3. By Gloria D. Thomas and Carol Hollenshead
 
2010
 
 
2009
 
 
"Satisfaction and Discontent: Voices of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty," By Inger Bergom and Jean Waltman. In On Campus With Women, vol 37, #3, 2009.
 
2008
 
Women of Color Faculty at the University of Michigan: Recruitment, Retention, and Campus Climate. Aimee Cox, PhD, Research Investigator Center for the Education of Women, CEW Jean Campbell Research Scholar (Executive Summary)
 
 
 
Developing a Transparent Tenure Process (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
Enabling Junior Faculty Success (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
2007
 

Post-Apartheid South Africa: Creating Critically Leaderful Schools that Make a Difference, 
Juliet Perumal, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and CEW Visting Scholar, 2007.

How American Men's Participation in Housework and Child-care Affects Wives' Careers. 
Renge Jibu, CEW Visiting Scholar

 
 
 
2006
Attrition Among Female Tenure-Track Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August
 
A Commitment to Volunteerism. Louise August, Carol Hollenshead and Sally Schmall
 

The Gender Impact of the Proposed Michigan Civil Rights Initiative: Research Brief. 
Susan Kaufmann

 

It Isn't Over: The Continuing Under-Representation of Female Faculty, paper presented at AIR, 
May 18, 2006, Louise August.

 
Non Tenure Track Faculty: The Landscape at U.S. Institutions of Higher Education: Full Report. Includes the Executive Summary as well as tables and charts reporting analyses of the survey data.
 
 
 
 
 
 
2005
 
 
 
 

Tenure Clock, Modified Duties, and Sick Leave Policies: Creating 'A Network of Support and Understanding' for University of Michigan Faculty Women During Pregnancy and Childbirth, 
Jean Waltman and Louise August

"Gender, Family, and Flexibility in Academia" Jeanne E. Miller and Carol Hollenshead in ChangeNovember/December 2005, pp.58-62
 
2004
 
"Developing and Implementing Work – Family Policies for Faculty," Beth Sullivan, Carol Hollenshead and Gilia Smith in Academe: Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors. November-December 2004.
 
2003
 
The 2003 Michigan Women's Leadership Index: Executive Summary, produced jointly by CEW and the Detroit Women's Economic Club.
 
Women at the University of Michigan: A Statistical Report on the Status of Women Students, Staff and Faculty on the Ann Arbor Campus, compiled by staff from CEW, Human Resource Records and Information Services, and the Office of Budget and Planning. (Replaced by 2010 Report)
 
2002
 
 
Sexing the Single Girl. Deborah Siegel, CEW Visiting Scholar
 
“Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation" by Carol S. Hollenshead, Beth Sullivan, Gilia C. Smith, Louise August, and Susan Hamilton is a chapter of The Challenge of Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work, New Directions in Higher Education no. 130, 2005, 41-65.
 
2001
 
 
2000
 
 
Women and Higher Education 2000: Michigan: a "Smart State" for Women? Susan Kaufmann, Sally Sharp, Jeanne E. Miller, and Jean Waltman

Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity­ (Findings) A joint report from CEW, Catalyst, and the University of Michigan Business School 
Women and the MBA. The full report is available through Catalyst.

Before 2000
 
Former Women Faculty: Reasons for Leaving One Research University. Stacy A. Wenzel and Carol Hollenshead 1998

The Michigan Faculty Work-Life Study 1999. Executive SummaryComplete Report
.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholar Program

The Visiting Scholar Program is an opportunity for scholars to pursue research projects relevant to women using the vast resources available through the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) and the University of Michigan. Scholars must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree. A scholar's stay at the Center can range from one to twelve months, as appropriate to the scholar's research needs. Visiting Scholars prepare a working paper based upon their research, which is published as part of the Center's series of occasional papers.

Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship

The Center for the Education of Women announces the Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship with a grant of up to $3,200. The fund will support research by a graduate student from the Islamic World or Africa matriculating in the Rackham Graduate School.


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Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Founded in 1974, the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University creates knowledge and seeks to implement change to promote gender equality. Our current focus is Moving Beyond the Stalled Gender Revolution. We are bringing together an intellectually diverse group of scholars to provide new insights into the barriers to women's advancement and to propose novel and workable solutions to advancing gender equality.

Contact

589 Capistrano Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8640
Ph. (650) 723-1994
Fx. (650) 725-0374
http://gender.stanford.edu/
gender-email@stanford.edu


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Principal Staff

Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, Executive Director
PH. (650) 723-1994
Email: lorim@stanford.edu

Shelley J. Correll, Director, Clayman Institute
Ph. (650) 723-1994
E-mail: scorrell@stanford.edu

Ann Enthoven, Program Manager
E-mail: ann.enthoven@stanford.edu

Andrea Rees Davies, Director of Programs and Research
E-mail: ardavies@stanford.edu

Wendy Skidmore, Program Associate

Marion Groh Marquardt, Web Specialist
Email: marionm@stanford.edu
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Projects & Campaigns

Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Ms. magazine in January 2012 at Stanford University. A keynote speech by Ms. founding editor, Gloria Steinem, will be the centerpiece of a Winter Quarter series of events that looks back on what Ms. has meant to its readers over the last 40 years and that looks ahead to what feminism may mean for the next generation.  
 
 
According to national studies, women hold more than half of all professional occupations in the U.S. but fewer than 24 percent of all computing-related occupations, representing a huge pool of untapped talent. The numbers are not moving in favor of increasing women's participation in technology; in 2008 women earned only 18 percent of all computer science degrees. Back in 1985, women earned 37 percent of CS degrees, nearly double today's share.

The Clayman Institute for Gender Research conducted two studies looking at the participation of women in technology and offering new ideas and solutions for increasing the role women play in the development and use of technology.
 
 
The lectures will take place in Winter Quarter at Stanford University. Lecturers will be selected competitively. Nominations by must include a description of the contribution of the nominee to advancing gender equality. Special emphasis will be placed on inviting women of color, women who reach across traditional disciplinary boundaries, and women who play a public role in advancing gender equality. Nominations are accepted on a rolling basis as lecture slots are still available. Nominators are encouraged to contact the Clayman Institute [email] to discuss potential nominees and nomination requirements prior to submitting a nomination.
 
The Clayman Institute will provide publicity and will cover the costs of travel, a small honorarium, and networking events and meals.
 
 
"Art at the Institute" exhibits artists, female and male, whose work critically engages with contemporary discourses around gender. Work seen at Serra House ranges from paintings to photography, computer manipulated images, weaving, prints, and mixed media, and illustrates artists' rich use of imagery, form, political perspectives, and grrrl attitude. The program will highlight the ways contemporary art takes part in the ongoing dialogues surrounding gender. 
 
 
The Clayman Institute supports efforts that translate our research and programs into actions for change. We have posted videos, discussion guides, and other ways to keep the conversation going. Sometimes, research is the first stop on the way to change.

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Reports & Resources

 
Meeting the needs and expectations of dual-career academic couples - while still ensuring the high quality of university faculty - is one of the great challenges facing universities. Academic couples (those with both partners working in an academic environment) represent a deep pool of talent. Yet, dual-career academic hiring often remains difficult and controversial. The Clayman Institute's 2008 study, Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need to Know, surveyed 30,000 faculty at 13 of the nation's leading public and private research universities. The report reviews practices, policies and programs for administrators to successfully work with the hiring and retaining of dual-career academic couples. Our pages contain resources for academic institutions and dual-career couples alike.

Aging

Yalom, Marilyn & Carstensen, Laura (eds). Inside the American Couple. ( Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002>

Difficult Dialogues Program - Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Aging in the 21st Century consensus report. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University, 2002)

Economic and social status of women

Clayman Institute. 2008. Climbing The Tech Ladder; Obstacles and Solutions for Mid-Level Women in Information Technology. Written by A. Henderson, C. Simard, S. Gilmartin, L. Schiebinger, and T. Whitney.

Strober, Myra and Agnes Miling Keneko Chan. The Road Winds Uphill All the Way: Gender, Work, and Family in the United States and Japan. (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1999)

Family

Clayman Institute. 2008. Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need To Know. Written by L. Schiebinger, A. Henderson, and S. Gilmartin.

Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Wife. ( New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers Inc., 2001)

Yalom, Marilyn and Thorne, Barrie (eds). Rethinking the Family. (Albany, NY: State University New York Press, 1990)

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Rhode, Deborah L. Speaking of Sex: The Denial of Gender Inequality. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997)

Rhode, Deborah L. Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Difference. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990)

Boxer, Marilyn Jacoby. When Women Ask the Questions: Creating Women's Studies in America. (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998)

Freedman, Estelle. No Turning Back. ( Westminster, MD: Ballantine Books, 2002)

Global Issues

Walker-Moffat, Wendy. The Other Side of the Asian American Success Story. (San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995)

Mahadevi Varma. Translated by Neera Kuckerja Sohoni. Sketches from My Past: Encounters with India's Oppressed. (Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 1997)

Mankekar, Purnima. Screening Culture, Viewing Politics: Television, Womanhood and Nation in Modern India. ( Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000)

Zheng, Wang. Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories. (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, Berkeley, 1999)

Health and Health Care

Litt, Iris. Taking Our Pulse: The Health of America's Women. (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1997)

History

Freedman, Estelle. Maternal Justice: Miriam Van Waters and the Female Reform Tradition. (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1996)

Gelles, Edith. First Thoughts: Life and Letters of Abigail Adams. (New York, NY: Twayne Publishers, 1998)

Gelles, Edith. Portia: The World of Abigail Adams. (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1992)

McCurry, Stephanie. Masters of Small Worlds: Yeoman Households, Gender Relations and the Political Culture of Antebellum South Carolina Low Country. (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1995)

Offen, Karen. European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000)

Schiebinger, Londa. Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World ( Harvard University Press, 2004)
Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Breast. (New York, NY: Knopf, 1997)

Science

Schiebinger, L., (ed.). 2008. Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering. Stanford University Press, 2008 was published on March 12, 2008.  

Schiebinger, Londa. Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science (Beacon Press, 1993; Rutgers University Press, 2004)

Schiebinger, Londa. Has Feminism Changed Science? (Harvard University Press, 1999)

Schiebinger, Londa. The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Harvard University Press, 1989)

Sexuality

Lewin, Ellen. Inventing Lesbian Cultures in America. (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1996)

Mintz, Beth & Rothblum, Esther (eds). Lesbians in Academia: Degrees of Freedom. (New York, NY: Routledge, 1997)


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

The Clayman Institute offers a two-year postdoctoral fellowship that focus on the Institute's theme, "Beyond the Stalled Revolution: Reinvigorating Gender Equality in the Twenty-first Century." Recent Ph.D.'s in all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences whose research focuses on gender are eligible. We encourage scholars with a strong interest in interdisciplinary methods to apply. While in residence at the Institute, Postdoctoral Scholars are expected to participate in Clayman Institute activities throughout the academic year in addition to pursuing their own research.

Graduate Dissertation Fellowships

The Clayman Institute’s Graduate Dissertation Fellowships (GDF) are awarded to outstanding Stanford doctoral students who are engaged in research on women and/or gender. The fellowships will provide financial support for top gender scholars as they complete their dissertations, while encouraging interdisciplinary connections for their research. Clayman GDFs will have offices at the Clayman Institute, where they will participate in the intellectual life of the Clayman Institute as well as take part in professional development workshops during the academic year.  GDFs will be contributing to the writing and research efforts of the Clayman Institute. Fellowship funding is for three quarters: two quarters of research assistantship and one quarter teaching assistantship. In addition to the stipend, GDFs will receive $1,000 in research funding.

Marilyn Yalom Research Fund

The Marilyn Yalom Research Fund supports currently enrolled Stanford Ph.D. candidates working in the humanities on issues concerning women and gender in the humanities.  The research funds support original research or conference costs. Dr. Yalom has been part of the Clayman Institute since 1978, having served as both Associate Director and Acting Director. She is currently a Senior Scholar, and is well known as an internationally acclaimed historian of women's and gender issues.

Majorie Lozoff Graduate Prize

The Marjorie Lozoff Prize is awarded annually by the Marjorie Lozoff Fund for Research on Women and Gender to promote scholarship in areas that further women's development. All currently registered Stanford University graduate students, in any academic or professional discipline, are eligible. The range of research topics include, but are not limited to: men and women's role within the family; the role of women and gender in science, medicine, and engineering; women's participation in the professions and other areas of work; women as entrepreneurs; women and gender in developing societies; women and gender cross-culturally. Preference will be given to original research on current social issues.

Myra Strober Prize

The Myra Strober Prize honors the best Gender News article written by a Stanford graduate or undergraduate student.  The $1,500 annual prize highlights news articles about women’s education, work, family, or the nexus of work and family.


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