Discrimination

Being a good mom: Talking the talk

In the immediate aftermath of Trayvon Martin’s death, The Talk was a buzzphrase in many mouths.  The Talk – the cautions, warnings, do’s and don’ts many parents of African American boys give them as they stretch forward out of childhood into manhood.  The Talk is part of the being-a-good-mom checklist, if you’re the mother of an African American boy. It is being responsible, proactive, aware.

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Is LGBTQ Progress Leading to Violence or Are We Reporting More?

At a time when twelve states have legalized same-sex marriage, it appears that LGBTQ rights are moving in a positive direction, even politically.  Republican politicians are becoming more vocal in their support of same-sex unions, despite the costs to their careers.  Top WNBA pick Brittany Griner was joined in her out-and-proud status by NBA center Jason Collins.


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No Reward, Therefore Not Worth the Risk: Why LGBTQ in the Military Are Still Not Coming Out

 Prior to the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) in 2011, an estimated 48,500 lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals were serving on active duty or in the ready reserve in the US military, and an additional 22,000 were in the standby and retired reserve forces, accounting for approximately 2.2 percent of military personnel.   But have these numbers changed since the repeal?  A Military Times poll found that just one of the soldiers surveyed had come out to his unit since the repeal of the policy.


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Oceans Apart: The Higher Health Costs of Women in the U.S. Compared to Other Nations, and How Reform Is Helping

An estimated 18.7 million U.S. women ages 19 to 64 were uninsured in 2010, up from 12.8 million in 2000. An additional 16.7 million women had health insurance but had such high out-of-pocket costs relative to their income that they were effectively underinsured in 2010. This issue brief examines the implications of poor coverage for women in the United States by comparing their experiences to those of women in 10 other industrialized nations, all of which have universal health insurance systems. The analysis finds that women in the United States—both with and without health insurance— are more likely to go without needed health care because of cost and have greater difficulty paying their medical bills than women in the 10 other countries. In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will substantially reduce health care cost exposure for all U.S. women by significantly expanding and improving health insurance coverage.

URL: 
http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Publications/Issue-Briefs/2012/Jul/Oceans-Apart-Women.aspx
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