Globalization

Globalization—as a political, economic and cultural trend—continues to have a mixed impact on women. Although it is strengthening promotion of gender equality around the world, it is also in many cases widening the gulf between rich and poor, accelerating environmental degradation and increasing the workloads of women and girls. The expanding global marketplace is increasing women’s employment opportunities but also producing jobs that may be temporary, unsafe or exploitive. Furthermore, economic reform programs imposed on developing countries by international financial institutions have often eroded critical services, such as public health and education programs, thereby increasing the caregiving burdens of women and girls. While globalization has opened up new avenues for some women, it has also led to increased hardship for others.

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The Gannon Center and EVOKE present Half the Sky with Sheryl WuDunn

Date/Time: 
03/23/2010

The 2010 Ann F. Baum Women and Leadership Speaker Series

 

Both Halves of the Sky: How Women of the Global North and South Make Each Other Whole

The Huffington Post
Gail Straub • February 2, 2010

More women in finance, a more sustainable economy

As has been pointed out with increasing frequency, a certain group think has been widely blamed for the economic crisis we find ourselves in today. Studies indicate that women are more comprehensive thinkers and less attracted to excessive risk than are their male peers.
 

URL: 
http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Opinion/2009/0624/p09s02-coop.html

Gender Inequality, Growth and Global Ageing

Reducing gender inequality could play a key role in addressing the twin problems of
population ageing and pension sustainability. In countries where it is relatively easy
for women to work and have children, female employment and fertility both tend to be
higher.
 

URL: 
http://www.ftd.de/wirtschaftswunder/resserver.php?bloId=10&resource=globalpaper154.pdf

Josephine Ho: The Criminalization of Economic and Sexual Underclasses

An excerpt from a lecture delivered at "Towards a Vision of Sexual and Economic Justice," an event held on November 29, 2007 at Barnard College.

Video URL: 
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Naomi Klein: Organizing the Precarious

An excerpt from a lecture delivered at "Towards a Vision of Sexual and Economic Justice," an event held on November 29, 2007 at Barnard College.

Video URL: 
Untitled
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Institute for Women's Studies

The University of Georgia Institute for Women’s Studies provides a feminist interdisciplinary perspective on women and gender. Administratively a program in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Women’s Studies cooperates with departments of all schools and colleges of the University in developing its curriculum and programming.

Traditional academic disciplines have devoted little systematic attention to issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality. In the past 30 years, feminist scholars have contributed to the reinterpretation of existing data and to the presentation of new knowledge about the diversity of women’s experiences. Through course work and outreach, the Institute for Women’s Studies offers students an opportunity to explore women’s lives in global and multicultural contexts.

Contact

210 Herty Drive
Athens, GA 30602-1802
Ph. (706) 542-2846
Fx. (706) 542-0049
http://www.uga.edu/iws/
wspinfo@uga.edu


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Principal Staff

Juanita Johnson-Bailey, Director
Ph. (706) 542-2846
E-mail: jjb@uga.edu

Cecilia Herles, Assistant Director
Ph. (706) 542-0734
E-mail: cherles@arches.uga.edu

Cicely Robinson-Jones, Business Manager
Ph. (706) 583-0495
E-mail: crob1117@uga.edu

Terri Hatfield, Program Coordinator
Ph. (706) 542-0066
E-mail: tlhat@uga.edu
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