Globalization

Globalization—as a political, economic and cultural trend—continues to have a mixed impact on women. Although it is strengthening promotion of gender equality around the world, it is also in many cases widening the gulf between rich and poor, accelerating environmental degradation and increasing the workloads of women and girls. The expanding global marketplace is increasing women’s employment opportunities but also producing jobs that may be temporary, unsafe or exploitive. Furthermore, economic reform programs imposed on developing countries by international financial institutions have often eroded critical services, such as public health and education programs, thereby increasing the caregiving burdens of women and girls. While globalization has opened up new avenues for some women, it has also led to increased hardship for others.

Making Macroeconomics Work for US: A Feminist Perspective

As the world experiences increasing inequalities and gaps between and within countries, women’s rights organizations are working to challenge current hegemonic systems and develop alternatives for change. Building on feminist economic analyses, the Center for Women's Global Leadership (CWGL) is undertaking the production of periodic briefs - Nexus: Shaping Feminist Visions in the 21st Century - to enhance women’s leadership for the realization of human rights. The briefs aim to both engender analytical and practical approaches to human rights in general, and economic and social rights in particular, as well as strengthen the capacity of feminist and social justice movements.

Brief Number 1 - "Making Macroeconomics Work For US: A Feminist Perspective" - highlights linkages between macroeconomics and human rights in order to better inform discussions about solutions to the current economic crisis in the United States.

URL: 
http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/globalcenter/publications/nexus/October%202011%20Brief%201.pdf
Member Organization: 

A Long Way to Go: Implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law in Afghanistan

The Government of Afghanistan took a big step forward in support of women’s equality and protection of women’s rights when it enacted the Law on the Elimination of Violence against Women (EVAW law) in August 2009. The landmark legislation criminalizes for the first time in Afghanistan child marriage, forced marriage, forced self-immolation and 19 other acts of violence against women including rape, and specifies punishments for perpetrators. This report from the UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan (UNAMA) and the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) examines implementation of the EVAW law by judicial and law enforcement officials throughout Afghanistan for the period of March 2010 to September 2011, and identifies both positive progress and large gaps.

URL: 
http://unama.unmissions.org/Portals/UNAMA/human%20rights/November%2023_UNAMA-OHCHR-Joint-Report-on-Implementation-of-EVAW-law_ENG.pdf

Meet Them Where They Are Participatory Action Research with Adolescent Girls

To protect and empower girls, programs must start with the girls themselves. This approach – one that meets girls where they are in their lives – was the foundation for an innovative participatory action research pilot project, which aimed to both understand and respond to girls’ HIV-related vulnerabilities. Working with older girls ages 12-17 and their communities in Newala District, one of the least developed and poorly resourced districts of Tanzania, the project's ultimate goal was to design and qualitatively assess a pilot intervention model to address the most pressing vulnerabilities of adolescent girls. This brief report summarizes the process and findings of the participatory action research with lessons for researchers, development practitioners and policymakers working with adolescent girls.

Jennifer McCleary-Sills, Zayid Douglas, Richard Mabala, Ellen Weiss
2011

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/meet-them-where-they-are

Women in the Boardroom: A Global Perspective

Women in the Boardroom: A Global Perspective, examines the legislative efforts being pursued across 17(i) countries to encourage more women to serve on listed company boards.

The updated edition of the report, by the Deloitte Global Center for Corporate Governance, comes after numerous governmental developments have evolved in several countries since the January 2011 publishing of the first edition. The new research highlights a variety of approaches to support diversity on boards, including requiring more disclosure, setting targets, and implementing quotas. According to the study, strong variations exist among countries regarding the most efficient way to achieve higher levels of diversity.

URL: 
http://www.corpgov.deloitte.com/binary/com.epicentric.contentmanagement.servlet.ContentDeliveryServlet/USEng/Documents/Nominating-Corporate%20Governance%20Committee/Board%20Composition%20and%20Recruitment/Women%20in%20the%20Boardroom_Deloitte_111511.pdf

A Decade Lost: Locating Gender in U.S. Counter-Terrorism. Throughout the United States’ decade-long "War on Terror"

A Decade Lost: Locating Gender in U.S. Counter-Terrorism provides the first global study of how the U.S. government's (USG) counter-terrorism efforts proffoundly implicate and impact women and sexual minorities. Over the last decade of the United States' "War on Terror," the oft-unspoken assumption that men suffer the most—both numerically and in terms of the nature of rights violations endured—has obscured the way women and sexual minorities experience counter-terrorism, rendering their rights violations invisible to policymakers and the human rights community alike.  This failure to consider either the differential impacts of counter-terrorism on women, men, and sexual minorities or the ways in which such measures use and affect gender stereotypes and relations cannot continue.
URL: 
http://www.chrgj.org/projects/docs/locatinggender.pdf
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