Human Rights & Security

Globalization—as a political, economic and cultural trend—continues to have a mixed impact on women. Although it is strengthening promotion of gender equality around the world, it is also in many cases widening the gulf between rich and poor, accelerating environmental degradation and increasing the workloads of women and girls. The expanding global marketplace is increasing women’s employment opportunities but also producing jobs that may be temporary, unsafe or exploitive. Furthermore, economic reform programs imposed on developing countries by international financial institutions have often eroded critical services, such as public health and education programs, thereby increasing the caregiving burdens of women and girls. While globalization has opened up new avenues for some women, it has also led to increased hardship for others.

Meet Them Where They Are Participatory Action Research with Adolescent Girls

To protect and empower girls, programs must start with the girls themselves. This approach – one that meets girls where they are in their lives – was the foundation for an innovative participatory action research pilot project, which aimed to both understand and respond to girls’ HIV-related vulnerabilities. Working with older girls ages 12-17 and their communities in Newala District, one of the least developed and poorly resourced districts of Tanzania, the project's ultimate goal was to design and qualitatively assess a pilot intervention model to address the most pressing vulnerabilities of adolescent girls. This brief report summarizes the process and findings of the participatory action research with lessons for researchers, development practitioners and policymakers working with adolescent girls.

Jennifer McCleary-Sills, Zayid Douglas, Richard Mabala, Ellen Weiss
2011

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/meet-them-where-they-are

A Decade Lost: Locating Gender in U.S. Counter-Terrorism. Throughout the United States’ decade-long "War on Terror"

A Decade Lost: Locating Gender in U.S. Counter-Terrorism provides the first global study of how the U.S. government's (USG) counter-terrorism efforts proffoundly implicate and impact women and sexual minorities. Over the last decade of the United States' "War on Terror," the oft-unspoken assumption that men suffer the most—both numerically and in terms of the nature of rights violations endured—has obscured the way women and sexual minorities experience counter-terrorism, rendering their rights violations invisible to policymakers and the human rights community alike.  This failure to consider either the differential impacts of counter-terrorism on women, men, and sexual minorities or the ways in which such measures use and affect gender stereotypes and relations cannot continue.
URL: 
http://www.chrgj.org/projects/docs/locatinggender.pdf

Karamatuna: An Investigation into the Sex Trafficking of Iraqi Women and Girls

This programme works to combat the sex-trafficking of women and children in the Middle East, whilst protecting them from gender based violence.
URL: 
http://www.sce-me.org/component/content/article/211

Child Marriage

Child marriage most often occurs in poor, rural communities. In many regions, parents arrange their daughter’s marriage unbeknownst to the girl. That can mean that one day, she may be at home playing with her siblings, and the next, she’s married off and sent to live in another village with her husband and his family – strangers, essentially. She is pulled out of school. She is separated from her peers. And once married, she is more likely to be a victim of domestic violence and suffer health complications associated with early sexual activity and childbearing.

ICRW’s early research provided a deeper understanding of the scope, causes and consequences of child marriage. Now, our experts are focused on how to prevent – and ultimately end – the practice. 

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/what-we-do/adolescents/child-marriage

Legal Aid is a Lifeline

The National Federation of Women's Institutes (UK) launches a report into violence against women and legal aid to coincide with the report stage of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill (31 October). Throughout the report, victims of domestic violence reiterate how access to legal aid secured their safety and protection in often life-threatening circumstances.

URL: 
http://www.thewi.org.uk/standard.aspx?id=23519
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