Human Rights & Security

Globalization—as a political, economic and cultural trend—continues to have a mixed impact on women. Although it is strengthening promotion of gender equality around the world, it is also in many cases widening the gulf between rich and poor, accelerating environmental degradation and increasing the workloads of women and girls. The expanding global marketplace is increasing women’s employment opportunities but also producing jobs that may be temporary, unsafe or exploitive. Furthermore, economic reform programs imposed on developing countries by international financial institutions have often eroded critical services, such as public health and education programs, thereby increasing the caregiving burdens of women and girls. While globalization has opened up new avenues for some women, it has also led to increased hardship for others.

Engendering agricultural research, development, and extension

 Research has shown that women, when given the capital and opportunity, make unique, positive contributions to development outcomes ranging from agricultural productivity to poverty reduction. It comes as little surprise, then, that agricultural research, development, and extension systems are generally more successful when scientists, researchers, and extension agents pay attention to gender issues. However, women continue to be underrepresented and underserved, and their contributions remain mostly untapped in national and international agricultural research. Worldwide, gender roles are culturally defined in all aspects of farming, from control of resources to production and marketing, and these definitions constrain and marginalize women. Even within the agricultural research community, most scientists and extension agents are male.

URL: 
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/engendering-agricultural-research-development-and-extension

Women 2012: Good News on Health and Education Bad News on Pay and Clout

By Natasha Cline-Thomas*

Each year, NCRW hosts an expert roundtable on the afternoon of its Awards Dinner. This year’s program Women 2012: Taking a Worldwide Reading was enlightening. It featured four leading experts who discussed findings from major national and global status reports on women and gender equality. They were: Iris Bohnet, Academic Dean, Professor of Public Policy, Director of the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School; Jeni Klugman, Director, Gender and Development, World Bank; Racquel Russell, Special Assistant to the President for Mobility and Opportunity, White House Domestic Policy Council; and Saadia Zahidi, Co-Author, World Economic Forum Gender Gap Report. Pat Mitchell, President and CEO, The Paley Center for Media moderated.


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Women, Business, and the Law

 Women, Business and the Law is a World Bank report that presents indicators based on laws and regulations affecting women's prospects as entrepreneurs and employees, in part drawing on laws contained in the Gender Law Library. Both resources can inform research and policy discussions on how to improve women's economic opportunities and outcomes.

URL: 
http://wbl.worldbank.org/

Gender Equality and Female Empowerment

Dr. Rajiv Shah, Administrator for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), launched the Agency's new Policy on Gender Equality and Female Empowerment.
 
Citing its importance, Dr. Shah stated, "We know that long-term, sustainable development will only be possible when women and men enjoy equal opportunity to rise to their potential. But today, women and girls continue to face disadvantages in every sector in which we work, and in other cases, boys are falling behind. With this policy, we can ensure our values and commitments are reflected in durable, meaningful results for all."
 
USAID Deputy Administrator, Ambassador Donald Steinberg, Gayle Smith, Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Development, and other senior White House officials participated in the launch.
URL: 
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/policy_planning_and_learning/documents/GenderEqualityPolicy.pdf

Rebuilding Hope: Polyclinic of Hope Care and Treatment Project A Holistic Approach for HIV-Positive Women Survivors of the Rwandan Genocide

The Polyclinic of Hope in Rwanda takes a comprehensive approach to combating gender-based violence for genocide survivors affected by HIV by facilitating support groups, encouraging income generation activities and providing HIV testing and treatment services.

This case study was prepared by the AIDSTAR-One project. As an AIDSTAR-One partner organization, ICRW provided technical oversight on this publication. The full case studies series and findings are available at AIDSTAR-One.
 
Saranga Jain, Margaret Greene, Zayid Douglas, Myra Betron, and Katherine Fritz
2011

 

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/rebuilding-hope-polyclinic-hope-care-and-treatment-project
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