Peace & Peace-building

From ancient times to the modern era, women have been at the forefront of disarmament, anti-war and anti-violence campaigns. In many countries, from Liberia and Rwanda to Northern Ireland, Afghanistan and Argentina, women’s activism has had a decisive impact on reducing conflict and encouraging reconciliation. Yet, women are usually absent from formal peace negotiations and processes. UNIFEM has reported that in ten major peace processes in the past decade, women represented only 6 percent of negotiators and less than 3 percent of signatories to peace agreements. With the passage of UN Security Council Resolution 1325, however, international recognition and support are growing for women as strategic partners in peacebuilding. Securing the active participation of women and girls increases the sustainability of peace efforts and contributes to long-term post-conflict recovery and reconstruction.

Invisible Market Energy and Agricultural Technologies for Women's Economic Advancement

This research explores what it takes for technology initiatives, specifically in the energy and agricultural sectors, to reach and economically benefit women in developing countries through market-based strategies that have the potential for achieving scale and financial sustainability. It builds on ICRW’s landmark paper, Bridging the Gender Divide: How Technology Can Advance Women Economically, which made the case for how technologies can create pathways for strengthening women’s economic opportunities.

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/invisible-market

Let Me Not Die Before My Time: Domestic Violence In West Africa

 A report from the International Rescue Committee (IRC) finds that in countries recovering from war in West Africa, domestic violence is the biggest threat to women's safety.

The report, called "Let Me Not Die Before My Time: Domestic Violence In West Africa," reveals that "across Ivory Coast, Liberia and Sierra Leone, years after the official end of these countries' brutal wars, women are being intimidated, threatened and beaten with shocking frequency."

Though domestic violence is a global issue affecting about one in three women worldwide, IRC chose to focus on these three West African countries to show how the problem can become more severe in post-conflict environments.

The report is based on 10 years of research and direct interaction with women and government leaders in Liberia, Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone. All three countries were embroiled in violent civil wars a decade ago, and those tensions remain.

URL: 
http://www.rescue.org/sites/default/files/resource-file/IRC_Report_DomVioWAfrica.pdf

Violence Against Women in Melanesia and Timor-Leste Progress made since the 2008 Office of Development Effectiveness report

This report builds on an earlier report published in 2008 by the Office of Development Effectiveness (ODE) of AusAID that assessed current approaches to addressing violence against women and girls in five of Australia’s partner countries: Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Timor-Leste.

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/violence-against-women-melanesia-and-timor-leste

World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development

 The 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development finds that women's lives around the world have improved dramatically, but gaps remain in many areas. The authors use a conceptual framework to examine progress to date, and then recommend policy actions.

URL: 
http://go.worldbank.org/CQCTMSFI40

Engendering agricultural research, development, and extension

 Research has shown that women, when given the capital and opportunity, make unique, positive contributions to development outcomes ranging from agricultural productivity to poverty reduction. It comes as little surprise, then, that agricultural research, development, and extension systems are generally more successful when scientists, researchers, and extension agents pay attention to gender issues. However, women continue to be underrepresented and underserved, and their contributions remain mostly untapped in national and international agricultural research. Worldwide, gender roles are culturally defined in all aspects of farming, from control of resources to production and marketing, and these definitions constrain and marginalize women. Even within the agricultural research community, most scientists and extension agents are male.

URL: 
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/engendering-agricultural-research-development-and-extension
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