Peace & Peace-building

From ancient times to the modern era, women have been at the forefront of disarmament, anti-war and anti-violence campaigns. In many countries, from Liberia and Rwanda to Northern Ireland, Afghanistan and Argentina, women’s activism has had a decisive impact on reducing conflict and encouraging reconciliation. Yet, women are usually absent from formal peace negotiations and processes. UNIFEM has reported that in ten major peace processes in the past decade, women represented only 6 percent of negotiators and less than 3 percent of signatories to peace agreements. With the passage of UN Security Council Resolution 1325, however, international recognition and support are growing for women as strategic partners in peacebuilding. Securing the active participation of women and girls increases the sustainability of peace efforts and contributes to long-term post-conflict recovery and reconstruction.

Feminist Dialogue on Militarism and Military Intervention for the 16 Days Campaign

The Center for Women's Global Leadership at Rutgers University has released this video of a feminist dialogue on militarism that it hosted as part of its 16 Days Campaign. The video features Yanar Mohammed (OWFI), Diana Duarte (MADRE), Ann Wright (Ret. US Army Colonel, former US diplomat, and peace activist), Cynthia Enloe (Professor at Clark University), and Esther Hyneman (Women for Afghan Women) and many others.

 


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Celebrating Unsung Heroines: “The Dressmaker of Khair Khana”

By Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

In 2005 I traveled to Afghanistan to write a newspaper story about women entrepreneurs, women who turned to business to create jobs and hope for their families. I wanted to find a story that no one was writing about, a story that mattered. That story was Kamila Sidiqi.


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 51.6708" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W

Abigail E. Disney is a filmmaker, philanthropist, and scholar. She has produced a number of documentaries focused on social themes, including the award-winning 2008 film Pray the Devil Back to Hell, which discovered and shared with the world the little-known story of how a small band of women dared to break barriers of gender and politics in Liberia and end a century of entrenched civil war. The film inspired her to to form Peace is Loud (peaceisloud.org), an organization that supports female voices and international peace-building through nonviolent means. Her current project, “Women, War & Peace,” is in production for PBS Wide Angle by her production company, Fork Films.

Location

New York, NY
United States
40° 42' 51.6708" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W

Enough talk - let's walk the walk

By Chloe Angyal*

As ethnic tension boils over into violence in Kyrgyzstan this week, rumors have begun to surface on the ground that amid the rioting, shooting and chaos, Kyrgyz women are being raped. Whether or not the rumor is true, the situation is all too familiar. When violence breaks out, women and girls, already vulnerable, are often among the first casualties, and the violence is often systematic, designed to demoralize their communities.


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 22' 30.3492" N, 71° 6' 20.1888" W

Megan MacKenzie recently spent a year as a post-doctoral fellow at the Belfer Center for International Security and the Women and Public Policy Program at the Kennedy School, Harvard University. Her research areas include gender and development, international relations, security studies, and post-conflict transitions. Megan is excited to be teaching courses related to these research interests, including a new course called “Sex, Power and Post-Conflict Reconstruction.” . 

Location

Cambridge, MA
United States
42° 22' 30.3492" N, 71° 6' 20.1888" W
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