Peace & Peace-building

From ancient times to the modern era, women have been at the forefront of disarmament, anti-war and anti-violence campaigns. In many countries, from Liberia and Rwanda to Northern Ireland, Afghanistan and Argentina, women’s activism has had a decisive impact on reducing conflict and encouraging reconciliation. Yet, women are usually absent from formal peace negotiations and processes. UNIFEM has reported that in ten major peace processes in the past decade, women represented only 6 percent of negotiators and less than 3 percent of signatories to peace agreements. With the passage of UN Security Council Resolution 1325, however, international recognition and support are growing for women as strategic partners in peacebuilding. Securing the active participation of women and girls increases the sustainability of peace efforts and contributes to long-term post-conflict recovery and reconstruction.

Clinton Speaks on Women and Girls at Afghan Conference/Remarks at the International Conference on Afghanistan

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, good afternoon, everyone. I think we have just wrapped up a very productive conference and we have seen the results of cooperation in the international community on a number of very important issues. I want to thank Prime Minister Brown and Foreign Secretary Miliband, the Government of Afghanistan, and the United Nations for bringing us all together and sponsoring this important meeting.
 

 

And I think that what we have seen is a global challenge that is being met with a global response. I especially thank the countries that have committed additional troops, leading with our host country, the United Kingdom, but including Italy, Germany, Romania. We also are grateful to all those who made their contributions known today. There are other countries such as Russia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, who are providing air space rights and other transit assistance.
 

 

Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice

Volume 16, Number 1, March 2004

Symposium: Women, Human Security
and Globalization

Special Editor: Linda Basch, National Council for Research on Women

Contents:

Linda Basch, Human Security, Globalization, and Feminist Visions
Mary Robinson, An Ethical, Human-Rights Approach to Globalization
Kristen Timothy, Human Security Discourse at the United Nations
Sadako Ogata, The Human Security Commission's Strategy
Charlotte Bunch, A Feminist Human Rights Lens
Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, Gender, Globalization and New Threats to Human Security
J. Ann Tickner, Feminist Responses to International Security Studies
Deborah L. Rhode, Gender and the U.S. Human Rights Record
Leith Mullings, Domestic Policy and Human Security in the U.S.
Gwyn Kirk and Margo Okazawa-Rey, Women Opposing U.S. Militarism in East Asia
Sally L. Kitch and Margaret A. Mills, Appropriating Women's Agendas

Teaser: 

Symposium: Women, Human Security and Globalization

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