Immigration & Migration

Worldwide, there are more than 190 million migrants living outside their countries of origin, nearly half of them women. Women may migrate out of choice but they are usually driven by necessity: poverty, conflict, domestic violence, natural disaster or oppressive political or cultural conditions. In North America, immigrant women have outnumbered immigrant men since 1930, yet their progress in education, income and status has lagged and policymakers have often overlooked their unique challenges and contributions. For instance, although they occupy lower-wage jobs, immigrant women send a much higher proportion of their earnings to their home countries than do immigrant men. Compared to non-immigrant women, immigrant women face higher rates of unemployment and are much more likely to live in poverty and suffer abuse or discrimination.

Barnard Center for Research on Women

Since its founding in 1971, the Barnard Center for Research on Women (BCRW) has been at the very forefront of feminist action and scholarship. BCRW promotes women’s and social justice issues in the local spheres of the Barnard College community and academic and activist networks in New York City, as well as having a voice in national and transnational feminist organizing and research. We are a well-recognized nexus of feminist thought, activism, and collaboration for scholars and activists alike.
 
BCRW’s mission, “to assure that women can live and work in dignity, autonomy, and equality,” is pursued through programming and events, production and distribution of print- and web-based publications, and collaboration with local and national activist and academic networks.

Contact

3009 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
Ph. 212/854-2067
Fx. 212/854-8294
http://www.barnard.edu/bcrw
bcrw@barnard.edu


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Principal Staff

Janet Jakobsen, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: jjakobsen@barnard.edu

Catherine Sameh, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: csameh@barnard.edu

Anne Jonas, Program Manager
E-mail: ajonas@barnard.edu

Pam Phillips, Administrative Assistant
E-mail: pphillips@barnard.edu

Hope Dector, New Media Management
E-mail: hdector@barnard.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Reports & Resources

S&FOnline

The Scholar & Feminist Online, a triannual, multimedia, online-only journal of feminist theories and women's movements, provides public access to the Barnard Center for Research on Women's most innovative programming by providing written transcripts, audio and visual recordings, and links to relevant intellectual and social action networks. The journal builds on these programs by publishing related scholarship and other applicable resources. A forum for scholars, activists, and artists whose work articulates the ever-evolving role of feminism in struggles for social justice, S&F Online brings you the latest in cutting-edge theory and practice.

New Feminist Solutions

Marking the newest direction in BCRW's more than thirty-five-year-old tradition of print publication, New Feminist Solutions is a series of reports geared toward informing and inspiring activists, policy-makers and others. Each report was written in collaboration with organizations and individuals who, like BCRW, have made a concerted effort to link feminist struggles to those of racial, economic, social and global justice. The reports are based on conversations and ideas emerging from conferences held at Barnard College, and are published in conjunction with websites featuring additional information from these events. Copies of the reports are free. They can be downloaded from the New Feminist Solutions website. Print copies can be requested by emailing bcrw@barnard.edu.

BCRW Newsletter

Published biannually, the BCRW newsletter provides event information and feature articles that communicate some of the broader issues engaged by the events, thus providing readers with a new way of understanding the work of the Center as a whole.

Guide to NYC Women's and Social Justice Organizations

This rich guide puts you in touch with the artists, activists and organizations whose work is most crucial to you. You'll find valuable information from nearly five hundred citywide organizations that work for sexual, racial, economic and social justice. The directory reflects our longtime commitment to building far-reaching, and sometimes unexpected coalitions.


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Center News

FAST FACT: New Trends Exposed in Modern Day Slavery

February 19, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird According to the U.S. State Department, 800,000 people were trafficked across national borders in 2006. This figure escalates into the millions when including victims trafficked within national borders.   A recently released report by the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime delves deeper into this troubling phenomenon:

Global Report on Trafficking in Persons (data from 155 countries)

--Most common form of human trafficking is sexual exploitation (79%) followed by forced labor (18%)


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FAST FACTS: Rights of Transgender Immigrants

January 29, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird FACT: “A growing number of people who have been persecuted for being transgender or transsexual have received asylum in the past few years, under the rubric of persecution on the basis of sexual orientation and/or gender… However, neither Citizenship and Immigration Services nor the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) has expressly recognized transgender people as “a particular social group” for the purposes of asylum.” I was thrilled to receive an announcement yesterday by the American Immigration Lawyers Association about their newly-released practice manual for lawyers representing transgender clients. 

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Post-Inauguration Reflections from the Council Staff

January 21, 2009 posted by Delores M. Walters [caption id="attachment_947" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Council Staff at Caroline's (Photo cred Deborah Siegel)"][/caption] On Inauguration Day, the Council staff gathered to watch the historic ceremony at Caroline’s, a club on Broadway in the Theater District of Manhattan.  The White House Project kindly hosted us.  I asked for everyone’s reflections.    Our reactions are a mirror of the hope, inspiration and goodwill stimulated by the inauguration of the nation’s first African American president. Multiple tasks lie ahead. We at the Council intend to continue in our process of growth and change. 1) What did today mean to you as a woman, a feminist, a US citizen, etc? 2) What moment stands out in your mind as most poignant from today's inaugural; did anything you heard or saw give you chills or goose bumps? 3) If you could make one wish for the Obama administration, what would it be? As a feminist who cares about equality, I am proud to be part of a nation that has evolved, from our history, to the point where race is no longer a key defining factor of who can be elected to lead our nation. And I'm excited to feel that I've played a small part in the contestations that have led to this moment. As a citizen, I'm thrilled that this historic happening, and the president we have elected, has captured the imagination of much of the world -- a world that seems willing to once again view us as a country of possibility, where change can happen. And I'm hopeful that we now have a leadership that can appreciate and leverage this renewed global trust and good will, and that will act, with humility, as a member of a world community of nations. 2 moments gave me goose bumps:

  • When I looked out over the Washington Mall to see the millions gathered -- people as far as we could see - to mark and share in this watershed moment in our history.
  • When Obama commented in his speech that we have elected a man president who 60 years ago may not have been able to get a seat at a lunch counter.

My wish is that Obama and his team will now turn their gaze to the many ways that women and girls are still disadvantaged and exploited, many of which we as an organization will bring to their attention!

--Linda Basch, President


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NEW YEAR'S FORUM: A Conversation with Kavita

January 6, 2009 posted by  Linda Basch As we start off with our New Year’s Resolutions for the nation, I begin with an inspiring conversation I recently had with Kavita Ramdas, President and CEO of the Global Fund for Women. We were musing about the future, particularly with regard to women’s human rights at this optimistic moment for the country, with a new administration about to take charge in Washington. But as Kavita pointed out, as we begin to look forward, we also need to be self reflective as a nation. We need to develop a sense of collective responsibility. A number of problems have grown up over the past several years that we can’t sweep away, that we must address as a country and hold ourselves accountable for. I couldn’t agree more. I love conversations that are as wide-ranging as this one was.  We covered a lot of ground.  Some highlights:  As someone who works on global women's rights, Kavita hopes that the new administration will place a high priority on advancing women's rights worldwide. This can only be achieved by the US decreasing its emphasis on militarism and violence as the primary means to resolve conflict and re-focusing its efforts away from the so called "war on terror" towards efforts to eradicate global poverty, inequality, and injustice. Yet, she insisted, that much of the US's ability to achieve such results globally will depend on the choices it makes inside its own borders. So, I asked Kavita what she would like to see in terms of change right here at home….


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Feminist Town Hall November 5, 2008 Live @ 7 PM ET

November 5, 2008 posted by Vivienne Heston-Demirel Apologies for audio problems. It is 7:30 and we are going LIVE.

7:27pm

Michelle Goldberg - journalist/author, specialized in ideology and politics - said she was optimistic but that there were a few dark clouds, namely, anti-gay ballot initiatives that passed in California, Florida, Arizona (anti-gay marriage), and Arkansas (anti-gay adoption). All of the anti-choice initiatives failed. There is a potential for extreme right-wing terrorism, including attacks on abortion providers.

7:45pm

Andrea Batista Schlesinger - Executive Director, Drum Major Institute for Public Policy - just concluded her opening statements.

7:48pm


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Latinas’ “Cafecito” with the Presidential Candidates

October 24, 2008 posted by Silvia Henriquez, Executive Director, National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health 

 

If Latinas had a “cafecito”* with each presidential candidate, what questions would we ask?

 


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