Multilateralism, Treaties, Laws & Conventions

Through multilateralism, countries work together to establish international standards and norms and to share responsibilities for their application. Organizations such as the United Nations and the World Trade Organization are primary examples of multilateral institutions. Since the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, nine core international human rights treaties have been ratified. These include the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Also known as the international bill of rights for women, CEDAW was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1979. So far, 185 countries have ratified CEDAW, with the United States being one of only eight countries that are not parties to the convention. International human rights agreements such as CEDAW benefit women by protecting their interests across borders and cultures. Governments are required to report regularly to monitoring bodies, and non-governmental organizations often submit dissenting views providing alternative evidence and information on compliance.

A vote for CEDAW is a vote for Women

By Kelsey Schwarz*

Like many other Americans, I was unfamiliar with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) until recently. CEDAW (also known as the Women’s Treaty) is an international agreement on basic human rights for women. So how had this escaped my attention? Is it because the US has supported human rights for decades so there is little talk of this particular treaty? No. Is it because it is a new treaty that we have just not heard of yet? No. CEDAW was introduced to the UN back during the Carter Administration and our Senate has been sitting on it ever since! Is it because we have achieved equal rights for women as a nation and help all other nations reach that same goal? Certainly not.


<< Back to the Full Blog

CEDAW: Time to Get the US on Board

Today at 12noon Demos is presenting a panel discussing why U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against women matters to women at home and abroad. This is a conversation you don't want to miss! Michelle Wucker, Executive Director of the World Policy Institute, will moderate the panel with three distinguished speakers:


<< Back to the Full Blog

CEDAW: Time to Get the US on Board

Display in Archives: 
0
04/29/2010

Come and learn why US ratification of CEDAW matters to women in this country and around the world and what you can do to help make it a reality. The women of the world are watching to see if we will join with them or stay in the company of the handful of other countries (Sudan, Somalia, Iran and a few smaller nations) who have not joined in this international cooperative effort for women's equality.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Violence Against Women Act

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is the most comprehensive federal legislation ever enacted to protect women, children, and families from violence. Programs under the act are administered through the Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women.

Attachment: 

NCRW Fact Sheet: The International Violence Against Women Act

I-VAWA would apply the force of U.S. diplomacy and provide $1 billion over five years to institute measures to prevent the abuse and exploitation that affects so many women worldwide.

Attachment: 

Where Do We Stand After 30 Years of CEDAW?

December 4, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Yesterday, three fabulous NCRW interns* and I journeyed down to the concrete maze that is the United Nations to participate in a commemorative event celebrating CEDAW’s 30th birthday. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, often referred to as the international bill of women’s human rights, was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1979. The Convention defines discrimination as


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content