International Organizations

International organizations and multilateral financial institutions play important roles in advancing the status of women and girls worldwide. The United Nations and its agencies, such as the UN Development Program, UNICEF, WHO, UNFPA and others, have made strides in efforts to “mainstream” gender initiatives throughout their policies and programs. The UN General Assembly passed a resolution in September 2009 to unify the four main organizations for gender equality into one unified entity. The new agency will unite UNIFEM, the DESA Division for the Advancement of Women, the Office of the Special Advisor on Gender Issues, and INSTRAW under one roof. This move aims to strengthen international support for gender equality, reduce bureaucratic redundancies and inefficiencies as well as improve accountability a and oversight . There is also a call for increased participation by civil society in monitoring governments and international organizations to ensure that their respective programs are actually improving the lives of women and girls.

Women's Demand for Reproductive Control: Understanding and Addressing Gender Barriers

 Millions of women each year experience unintended pregnancies, and millions more have unmet need for family planning. One of the persistent gaps in knowledge is the role of gender barriers that women face in defining and achieving their reproductive intentions. This paper provides a gender analysis of women’s demand for reproductive control. This analysis illuminates how the social construction of gender affects fertility preferences, unmet need, and the barriers that women face to using contraception and safe abortion. It also helps to bridge important dichotomies in the population, family planning, and reproductive health fields.

Jennifer McCleary-Sills, Allison McGonagle, Anju Malhotra
2012

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/womens-demand-reproductive-control

Progress of the World's Women

UN report Progress of the World’s Women outlines ten recommendations to make justice systems work for women. They are proven and achievable and, if implemented, they hold enormous potential to increase women’s access to justice and advance gender equality.

URL: 
http://progress.unwomen.org/

Executive Assistant to the President

Dinah Asante is Executive Assistant to the President. She has an M.S. in Urban Policy from the New School and studied at Algonquin College in Ottawa, Canada and the State University of New York, Old Westbury from which she received a B.S. in Marketing. She conducted research for the Women's HIV Collaborative of New York and for the Supportive Housing Network of New York. Dinah has private sector experience in the U.K. and U.S. and has held administrative positions for companies in Accra, London, and Ottawa. She also taught French in Ghana.

Fact Sheet: Empowering Women in Agriculture

 Rural women around the world play a key role in supporting their households and communities in achieving food and nutrition security, generating income, growing small businesses, and overall well-being. They contribute to agriculture and fuel local and global economies. As such, women are active players in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

Yet every day, rural women and girls face persistent structural constraints that prevent them from fully enjoying their human rights, and hamper their efforts to improve their lives and the lives of those around them.

From Bread for the World

URL: 
http://www.bread.org/what-we-do/resources/fact-sheets/empowering-women-in-agriculture.pdf

Women at the frontline of climate change - Gender risks and hopes

 Women are often in the frontline in respect to the impacts of a changing climate. Globally the world is seeing increasingly frequent droughts and floods which are having economic but also profound social consequences. The women and people of Asia are currently at greatest risk with over 100 million people affected in this region annually.

URL: 
http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/women-and-climate-change/
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