Disparities & Access

Many of the health challenges faced by women are a result of insufficient access to basic prevention information, health services and insurance coverage. In the pharmaceutical and health industries, the gender dimensions of diseases and treatments are often overlooked in setting research priorities and developing new products. The availability and quality of health care may vary according to race, income, ability, geographic location or immigration status. In the U.S., finding affordable health insurance is particularly challenging for women, who often pay higher premiums than men. Many insurance companies fail to cover or provide adequate maternity care or essential reproductive health services. Additionally, women experience more part-time and interrupted jobs and careers due to caregiving and family responsibilities and require portable health plans that provide stable coverage.

Findings From Recent National Survey On Coverage for Prescription Birth Control

on the eve of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ “Fortnight for Freedom” to roll back birth control coverage, Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) and the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) released new data clearly showing that American voters overwhelmingly support access to affordable birth control and understand that it is an issue of basic economic fairness and health, not religious liberty.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/Me10608.pdf
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Variation in Service Delivery Practices Among Clinics Providing Publicly Funded Family Planning Services in 2010

A new nationally representative survey from the Guttmacher Institute shows that the national network of publicly funded family planning clinics—which helps millions of women avoid unintended pregnancies and plan the timing of wanted pregnancies—gives women vital access to contraceptive and other preventive care, according to "Variation in Service Delivery Practices Among Clinics Providing Publicly Funded Family Planning Services in 2010," by Jennifer Frostet al. More than half of publicly funded clinics (54%) reported offering their clients at least 10 of 13 reversible contraceptive methods in 2010, an increase from 35% in 2003. Many offer on-site provision of the most widely used contraceptives and have implemented protocols to make it easier for women to initiate and continue use of their chosen method.

URL: 
http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/clinic-survey-2010.pdf

An Early Assessment of the Potential Impact of Texas’ “Affiliation” Regulation on Access to Care for Low-income Women

As a federal appeals court considers the legality of Texas’ family planning “affiliation regulation,” a new report provides a preliminary assessment of the impact of the Texas rule on preventive care access by low-income women.

“An Early Assessment of the Potential Impact of Texas’ “Affiliation” Regulation on Access to Care for Low-income Women,” released by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative, reports on the impact of Texas’ “affiliation rule” on access to cancer screening, preventive health care, and family planning services by low-income women.

URL: 
http://www.gwumc.edu/sphhs/departments/healthpolicy/dhp_publications/pub_uploads/dhpPublication_0900DA16-5056-9D20-3DFD539FF662D155.pdf
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