HIV/AIDS

Worldwide, about half the HIV-positive population is made up of women. In Sub-Saharan Africa 60 percent of those living with HIV are women in a region that accounts for 75 percent of AIDS deaths. Globally, women are more vulnerable to the virus due to sexual coercion, early marriage, cultural stigma and poverty. In the U.S., HIV is the third leading cause of death among African American women aged 25-44 compared with the fifth leading cause for all women. Low-income women suffer disproportionately: nearly two-thirds of HIV-positive women in the U.S. report annual incomes of under $10,000. Our network is active at the research, grassroots and public health levels, raising awareness about disparities and ensuring that prevention, testing and treatment are made more affordable and accessible.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Immigrant Women--Access to Health Insurance, Healthcare and Public Services

Immigrant women face particular hardship in accessing basic health and other vital services due to a series of legal, social and cultural barriers that prevent them from exercising their civil rights. More efforts need to be focused at the local, state and national levels to ensure that their needs are recognized and addressed.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Alleviating Health Disparities--Key to a Healthy and Productive Nation

Alleviating health disparities is considered critical for building a healthier, more productive society. Health disparities refer to the gaps in quality of health and health care across gender, racial, ethnic, socio-economic and other indicators.

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FAST FACT: Childbirth Deaths Exceed 2 Million Worldwide

December 2, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

A study released this fall reported some chilling trends:

  • More than 2 million babies and mothers die worldwide each year from childbirth complications, outnumbering child deaths from malaria and HIV/AIDS
  • About 42 percent of the world's 536,000 maternal deaths occur during childbirth

The research was led by the Save the Children Foundation, the Gates Foundation, and Johns Hopkins University.

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Engendering Justice: Women, Prisons and Change

In the last decade, we have witnessed the population of incarcerated women increase to 400 percent. Building on this development, Rebecca Haimowitz reflects on the interlinkage between incarceration and issues such as race, class, education, national identity, and gender conformity. 

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CWGL Report: “Strengthening Resistance: Confronting Violence Against Women and HIV/AIDS,”

CWGL Report: "Strengthening Resistance: Confronting Violence Against Women and HIV/AIDS," Cynthia Rothschild, Mary Anne Reilly and Sara A. Nordstrom (2006).

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http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/globalcenter/publications/strengthening.pdf

FAST FACT: Don’t Forget About Health in the Economic Storm

March 12, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird This week is http://www.lgbthealth.net/awarenessweek09/ ">National LGBT Health Awareness week.  In honor of this important week, I wanted to share with you a stat I found from the Big Five Research: 50 percent of uninsured women have dependent children and half of them (54 percent) are employed. Even as much of our energy has been focused these past few months on the economy, I think it is vital we don’t forget about the importance of health!  Which is why the Council features both economic security and health as part of our Big Five Campaign.


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Who Cares?

March 2, 2009 posted by admin The 53rd Commission on the Status of Women meetings start today at UN Headquarters in New York and will run until the 13th of March.  This year, the theme of the CSW is “The equal sharing of responsibilities between women and men, including caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS.” During this year’s events, I will have the privilege of working with the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development’s (UNRISD) Gender and Development Programme. The Gender and Development Programme at UNRISD has been working on the Political and Social Economy of Care as one of its main research themes for several years now. [One of my favorite gender and development researchers, Maxine Molyneux, wrote the first paper in the series, titled Mothers at the Service of the State.]  As part of the project, UNRISD led gender experts from around the world in an exploration of care issues, with research conducted in eight countries drawn from four different regions.  Within its comparative approach, the project focused on the gender composition and dynamics of the multiple institutions of care – households and families, states, markets, and the not-for-profit sector – and their effects on poverty and social rights of citizenship.


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