Sexuality & Gender

Sexuality and gender are a major focus of NCRW member center research, policy and advocacy efforts. Increasing support for LGBT rights, both nationally and internationally, is an outgrowth of such research and public awareness campaigns. Our network recognizes the complexity of human sexuality and how gender roles can be stereotyped and narrowly defined by society. There are important sexuality and gender dimensions to policymaking and legal rights, including those related to marriage, the custodial rights of unmarried single parents and same-sex couples, and anti-discrimination employment and housing laws. Our member centers are examining gender identity and the ever-evolving perceptions of masculinity and femininity in popular culture and politics.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 15.3972" N, 74° 0' 36.5976" W

Bethany Cole has worked for over ten years in international health and has demonstrated expertise in sexual and reproductive health and rights. Currently based in New York, she is a Senior Program Associate with EngenderHealth on the Fistula Care Project to build provider and facility capacity in reproductive health services for obstetric fistula. Her portfolio includes prevention and care activities with partner organizations in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, Ethiopia and Nigeria. She also provided management and technical support to a wide range of EngenderHealth’s family planning, maternal health and HIV and AIDS projects in West and Central Africa. Previously, following completion as a Peace Corps Volunteer in francophone Cameroon, she conducted monitoring and evaluation of food programs for unaccompanied minors in Rwanda, and worked in Sudan with the International Rescue Committee as a Field Manager in Nyala, South Darfur.

Location

New York, NY 10005
United States
40° 42' 15.3972" N, 74° 0' 36.5976" W
Associated Issues & Expertise:

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 45' 5.7276" N, 74° 0' 15.9588" W

Sharon Stapel, Esq. is the Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project (AVP). AVP is the country’s largest organization dedicated to eliminating hate violence, sexual violence, and domestic/intimate partner violence affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. AVP provides direct client services in New York City and engages in advocacy and public education locally and nationally. AVP coordinates the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, a coalition of 42 anti-violence programs dedicated to creating a national response to anti-LGBTQ violence, and the New York State LGBTQ Domestic Violence Network, a statewide, multidisciplinary group of direct service providers, community-based agencies, advocates, educators, policy makers and funders working on behalf of LGBTQ communities affected by domestic violence.

Location

New York, NY 10001
United States
40° 45' 5.7276" N, 74° 0' 15.9588" W

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 43' 33.1248" N, 73° 59' 52.5552" W

Juhu Thukral is the Director of Law and Advocacy at The Opportunity Agenda. She has been an advocate for the rights of low-income and immigrant women in the areas of sexual health and rights, gender-based violence, economic security, and criminal justice for 20 years. Prior to joining The Opportunity Agenda, Ms. Thukral was the founder and Director of the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center in New York City. She founded the Sex Workers Project in 2001, after recognizing the strong need for an organization that protects the legal rights of sex workers, many of whom are low-income and immigrant women of color. Ms. Thukral envisioned and developed the SWP’s legal and programmatic initiatives around sex work and human rights, trafficking in persons, and economic security. She also raised the funding for the project and managed its partnerships with a diverse array of collaborating organizations.

Location

New York, NY 10012
United States
40° 43' 33.1248" N, 73° 59' 52.5552" W

HUMAN RIGHTS FORUM: Human Rights, Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in Serbia

By Jelena Prosevski* 

“…capabilities to choose a life one has a reason to value”, Amartya Sen

Just two months ago the Pride Parade in Serbia was followed by a riot of protesters who attacked the police and demolished downtown Belgrade.  By the time the rioting started, according to the reports from Belgrade, the majority of the Parade participants had already been in the safety of their homes, at times even driven there by the police in order to ensure safety. Among those who were unfortunately injured were primarily police force members.


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From the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

On September 23, 2010, UN delegates gathered to call for an end to human rights violations directed againg LGBT people.  According to this article, LGBT people may still face criminal sanctions in nearly 80 countries. 

In honor of Human Rights Day, take a moment to view this video of Navi Pillay, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights:


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HUMAN RIGHTS FORUM: Spirituality as a Vehicle for Social Change

By Daniela Jauk*

Considering that I am a sociologist and feminist, you might be surprised when I say a human rights approach to women’s, gender and sexual rights is important because it adds a spiritual component to our global social justice work. We have theoretically and practically moved into an era in which what is means to be a man or a woman have become blurry. A vast body of research has deconstructed the social notion of the male/female dichotomy, demonstrating that there is not enough biological evidence to draw a clear line between the sexes. A variety of transgender and genderqueer experiences as well as fluid sexualities increasingly enrich our societies. Regardless of how we identify or who we are attracted to, we all benefit from expanding recognition of gender and sexual diversity.


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Working at the Intersections: ARC’s Better Together Report

By Kyla Bender-Baird

This afternoon I joined a webinar discussion on the Applied Research Center’s report, Better Together: Research Findings on the Relationship between Racial Justice and LGBT Communities. This report details the work being done at the intersection of sexuality, gender identity, and racial justice. Make no mistake—this work is happening, even if it is not discussed in mainstream media or non-profit discourse. ARC surveyed 41 racial justice groups and 40 LGBT organizations of color. They found four elements of success in working at the intersections of LGBT and racial justice:


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