Body Image & Wellness

Unattainable and idealized images of women’s and girls’ bodies are visible in every aspect of advertising and mass communication. Women and girls are bombarded constantly with messages that treat them as objects of sexual fantasy and exploitation or that demean them. Popular culture promotes unrealistic standards of beauty and makes women – particularly young women – susceptible to distorted body images, low self-esteem and psychological and eating disorders. The multi-billion dollar cosmetic surgery industry poses increased health risks for women, including life-long disfigurement. Researchers in our network are documenting negative messaging while encouraging a healthy representation of female beauty in which intellect, creativity and character trump thinness and physical perfection.

Dr. Susan Wicklund: The Perils of Providing Abortions

Just one month after the death of Dr. George Tiller, the Center for Reproductive Rights released a chilling report that shows abortion providers and their clinics are under siege. A four-month investigation in six states revealed that death threats, break ins, and assaults continue to impede women's access to clinics. Rather than use Tiller's death to make the case that doctors and their patients should be protected, the federal government has done very little. So how should those who believe in a woman's right to have an abortion respond?

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Cecile Richards on the Stupak-Pitts Amendment

Cecile Richards, President of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, speaks with MSNBC's Chris Matthews about the Stupak-Pitts amendment which would comprise the most severe limitation on a woman's right to access safe and legal abortion care in a generation.

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Statement of Cecile Richards, President of PPFA on the Executive Order of the President on Abortion and Health Care Reform

"We regret that a pro-choice president of a pro-choice nation was forced to sign an Executive Order that further codifies the proposed anti-choice language in the health care reform bill, originally proposed by Senator Ben Nelson of Nebraska.  What the president’s Executive Order did not do is include the complete and total ban on private health insurance coverage for abortion that Congressman Bart Stupak (D–MI) had insisted upon. So while we regret that this proposed Executive Order has given the imprimatur of the president to Senator Nelson’s language, we are grateful that it does not include the Stupak abortion ban." 

 

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Statement of Cecile Richards, President of PPFA, on House Passing Historic Health Care Reform Bill

“Today is a truly historic day for the American people who have long demanded affordable, quality health care coverage.

NCRW Network Promotes the Voices and Concerns of Girls

The National Council for Research on Women harnesses the resources of its network to ensure fully informed debate, policies, and practices to build a more inclusive and equitable world for women and girls. And we take that last part seriously. Girls cannot be left out of the equation. They are an important part of our movement for social change. As Chris Grumm, President and CEO of the Women’s Funding Network, recently said at NCRW’s afternoon program, the bifurcation between women and girls in our movement is unhelpful, dangerous, and may be holding us back. Recent research and advocacy by our member centers clearly demonstrates the importance of keeping girl’s voices and concerns front and center.


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Annual Conference 2010: Strategic Imperatives for Ending Violence Against Women

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06/11/2010 - 06/12/2010

 

The National Council for Research on Women in partnership with the US National Committee for UNIFEM present
Strategic Imperatives for Ending Violence against Women: Linkages to Education, Economic Security and Health
June 11-12, 2010
Hunter College, CUNY, West Building, New York City
 

Hosted By
The Women and Gender Studies Program and Roosevelt House,
Hunter College, CUNY (City University of New York)

SPONSORS

New Faculty Colloquium - The Effect of Acculturation and Racial Identity on the Body Image of African-American Women

Date/Time: 
04/28/2010

New Faculty Colloquium - The Effect of Acculturation and Racial Identity on the Body Image of African-American Women

Dr. Germine Awad

Location: Gar 2.112

Fat and Identity Politics, UCLA

UCLA Center for the Study of Women presents Paul Campos, author of "The Obesity Myth: Why America's Obsession with Weight is Hazardous to Your Health." In this talk, he discusses efforts to make fat people thin, through weight-loss diets, drugs, and surgery. Campos sees weight as a political and social issue and notes that body size is often used as a tool of discrimination, especially against women. Organized by Prof Abigail Saguy, Department of Sociology at UCLA, this talk is part of the Gender and Body Size lecture series, which addresses the new interdisciplinary field of "fat studies." Recent discussions of body weight have been dominated by health policy concerns over the so-called obesity epidemic. Despite a long tradition of feminist critique of fat hatred as a problem of patriarchy, there has been very little critique of the growing emphasis on the importance of slenderness for health reasons.

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"Starving for Identity: A Grounded Analysis of the Pro-Anorexia Movement"

Date/Time: 
04/13/2010

"The present research used grounded theory to critically analyze the pro-anorexia movement. 24 pro-anorexia websites were systematically coded for a unifying emergent theory. The findings indicate that the pro-ana cyber community represents a collective effort to establish a shared social understanding or identity among individuals who feel confused, isolated or subjugated - and have significant issues with food and weight. Pro-anorexia websites provide users a new context to enhance or redefine their self-concepts and/or stigmatized identity. Pro-anorexia subscription affords the opportunity to create and validate an identity that is protected under a shroud of technological anonymity. Interestingly, there seems to be two dominant pro-anorexia accounts or perspectives. One account seems to emphasize pro-anorexia as a sanctuary, and a means to gain a deeper understanding of their disease or disorder ...

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