Women in STEM

Over the last 30 years, the number of women earning bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in math and science has increased significantly. This success has been largely due to the work of educational institutions, foundations, professional networks and research and advocacy organizations. Yet despite these efforts, a huge gap still exists between the numbers of women and men pursuing advanced studies and careers in science – especially in physics, chemistry, engineering, computer science and technology. Schools, colleges, the technology sector and businesses, as well as other sectors, need to intensify efforts to recruit and retain talented women in STEM fields. Advancement for women not only diversifies the workforce, but also provides gender balance in setting research goals, developing new product lines and enhancing innovative and strategic decision-making.

Women in STEM and Negotiation

By Rebecca Chaleff*

Last Thursday, September 22nd, I went to CUNY Graduate Center’s event, “Women in Science: Negotiating a Successful Academic Career,” at the Segal Theatre, which was moderated by Dr. Gillian Small, CUNY’s Vice Chancellor for Research, and featured an animated address from keynote speaker Dr. Maribel Vazquez.  Also on board was a distinguished panel of experts, including: Dr. Dongming Cai, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Mary Kern, Pamela Silverblatt, Esq., and Dr. Ruth Stark.  Together, they offered a wide range of personal perspectives on the main issue at hand: negotiation.


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Department of Commerce Releases STEM Gender Gap Report

 By Ariella Faitelson*


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