Women in STEM

Over the last 30 years, the number of women earning bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in math and science has increased significantly. This success has been largely due to the work of educational institutions, foundations, professional networks and research and advocacy organizations. Yet despite these efforts, a huge gap still exists between the numbers of women and men pursuing advanced studies and careers in science – especially in physics, chemistry, engineering, computer science and technology. Schools, colleges, the technology sector and businesses, as well as other sectors, need to intensify efforts to recruit and retain talented women in STEM fields. Advancement for women not only diversifies the workforce, but also provides gender balance in setting research goals, developing new product lines and enhancing innovative and strategic decision-making.

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How to Write Successful Grants to Advance Women in Science

Date/Time: 
04/26/2011

The National Women's Studies Association is pleased to offer an interactive audiovisual workshop on how to successfully navigate the National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant process. ADVANCE grants are intended to increase the participation and advancement of women in academic and science engineering careers.

Led by successful NSF ADVANCE grant-seekers, this webinar is designed to offer useful insight into the grant-seeking process. Participants can expect to learn how to develop and cultivate collaborations between women's studies and the sciences and how to write successful grants.

NWSA offers this ongoing series of professional development trainings to support women’s studies and women’s center professionals and strengthen the field.

DATE: Tuesday, April 26
TIME: 4:00-5:15 PM Eastern
FEE: $75 members, $100 non-members

“False Start: A Missed Opportunity for Women and Girls in STEM in the Race to the Top Awards”

COCHRANVILLE, PA (3/29/11)

NAPE Report Indicates Missed Opportunity to Prepare Women and Girls for STEM Careers

URL: 
http://www.ncrw.org/content/false-start-missed-opportunity-women-and-girls-stem-race-top-awards

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership

Female students have now surpassed their male peers in high school and college graduation rates. Yet across sectors, women’s representation in professional leadership roles has stalled at 15-17%. If women make up the majority of students earning Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees why are there so few women in top management positions? Further aggravating women’s uneven progress, the disparity is often most pronounced in the most lucrative fields, especially STEM, economics, and finance. 

Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences

Premier science largely depends on the quality of the pool of future scientists. For this reason the United States has made a major effort over the past 30 years to attract more outstanding U.S. students, particularly women, into research science. Women have risen to the challenge with significant increases in all physical sciences and engineering, and they have made a huge advance in the life sciences, where they now receive more than 50 percent of all Ph.D.s. Women now represent a large part of the talent pool for research science, but many data sources indicate that they are more likely than men to “leak” out of the pipeline in the sciences before obtaining tenure at a college or university. The loss of these women, together with serious increases in European and Asian nations’ capacity for research, means the long-term dependability of a highly trained U.S. workforce and global preeminence in the sciences may be in question. 

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html

Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership

Female students have long surpassed their male peers in the rates at which they seek higher education. Yet across sectors, women’s representation in professional leadership roles has stalled at 15-17%. If women make up the majority of students earning Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees why are there so few women in top management positions? Further aggravating women’s uneven progress, the disparity is often most pronounced in the most lucrative fields, including STEM, economics and finance. 


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Dr. Mariko Chang is the author of the new book, Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, and the main author of the March 2010 report “Lifting as We Climb Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future.” Dr. Chang has a PhD in Sociology from Stanford University and was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University from 1998 to 2007 where she published work on occupational sex segregation across countries, the use of social networks for gathering financial information and began her work on the gender wealth gap. To help raise awareness of the wealth gap, she maintains a website that provides data and other information on wealth, assets, and debt for public policy makers, the media, researchers, and organizations that address economic security.
 

Location

Boston, MA
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W
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