Women in STEM

Over the last 30 years, the number of women earning bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in math and science has increased significantly. This success has been largely due to the work of educational institutions, foundations, professional networks and research and advocacy organizations. Yet despite these efforts, a huge gap still exists between the numbers of women and men pursuing advanced studies and careers in science – especially in physics, chemistry, engineering, computer science and technology. Schools, colleges, the technology sector and businesses, as well as other sectors, need to intensify efforts to recruit and retain talented women in STEM fields. Advancement for women not only diversifies the workforce, but also provides gender balance in setting research goals, developing new product lines and enhancing innovative and strategic decision-making.

Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership

Female students have long surpassed their male peers in the rates at which they seek higher education. Yet across sectors, women’s representation in professional leadership roles has stalled at 15-17%. If women make up the majority of students earning Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees why are there so few women in top management positions? Further aggravating women’s uneven progress, the disparity is often most pronounced in the most lucrative fields, including STEM, economics and finance. 


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Dr. Mariko Chang is the author of the new book, Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, and the main author of the March 2010 report “Lifting as We Climb Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future.” Dr. Chang has a PhD in Sociology from Stanford University and was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University from 1998 to 2007 where she published work on occupational sex segregation across countries, the use of social networks for gathering financial information and began her work on the gender wealth gap. To help raise awareness of the wealth gap, she maintains a website that provides data and other information on wealth, assets, and debt for public policy makers, the media, researchers, and organizations that address economic security.
 

Location

Boston, MA
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Gender and Technology

This project tackles what too often seems to be an insurmountable problem: the lack of women in technology fields. Research shows that fewer girls are going into computer science partly because fewer women are in technology fields and those that are in the field continue to drop out at high rates, especially at pivotal mid-points in their careers. This is true across industry, government and educational institutions in the United States.

To shed light on this problem, Jenna Gretsch selected a group of peers, mostly women who were at mid-points or higher in their careers and asked them questions regarding how they got into computers and what keeps them there. Specifically, Gretsch solicited their reflections and experiences regarding gender discrimination and inequality.

 

URL: 
http://www.jennagretsch.com/index.php

Emilie and the Scientific Community

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

I am finished writing and thinking about socially conservative Texans (for now). But I still have history texts on the mind.

Here’s the dilemma: in a conversation with a like-minded male progressive, I was surprised to realize that, while sympathetic to the fact that girls have few female role models to read about in school, he didn’t see an obvious solution. He thought maybe a few more women could be highlighted, but he offered the following to explain why men would continue to outnumber women in the texts for years to come:


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Q&A with Alice Domurat Dreger on Social Justice, Scholarship, and Women in STEM

Under the Microscope, an online space hosted by The Feminist Press "where women and science connect," just posted a fascinating conversation with Alice Domurat Dreger, a bioethicist and author who I know from her work on intersex activism.  Here's a snippet for your reading pleasure:

UtM: Are there any particular issues in bioethics you want to tackle or anything in particular you are working on now? 


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Media Ignores the Importance of Housework in Divorce Rates and Career Advancement

By Londa Schiebinger and Lori Nishiura Mackenzie

ORIGINALLY POSTED MAY 23, 2010 ON THE HUFFINGTON POST

The Telegraph picked up a recently published London School of Economics research about housework. They were in lonely company. The piece did not see the light of day in the Financial Times, The New York Times or the Washington Post. Why not? Could it be that housework is not considered a serious topic?


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