Women in STEM

Over the last 30 years, the number of women earning bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in math and science has increased significantly. This success has been largely due to the work of educational institutions, foundations, professional networks and research and advocacy organizations. Yet despite these efforts, a huge gap still exists between the numbers of women and men pursuing advanced studies and careers in science – especially in physics, chemistry, engineering, computer science and technology. Schools, colleges, the technology sector and businesses, as well as other sectors, need to intensify efforts to recruit and retain talented women in STEM fields. Advancement for women not only diversifies the workforce, but also provides gender balance in setting research goals, developing new product lines and enhancing innovative and strategic decision-making.

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for women in Science, Engineering, and Technology.   

WOMEN IN CHEMISTRY SYMPOSIUM

Date/Time: 
03/16/2010

WOMEN IN CHEMISTRY SYMPOSIUM

All WST Center Events are co-sponsored with ADVANCE, free, and open to the public. Please RSVP to Irina Nikiforova if you are interested in attending.

The Ever Increasing Majority of Women Graduates

According to a recent OECD report, Higher Education to 2030, women will become an even larger majority of the graduate talent pool in only one decade. Companies are already having to ensure that they don’t swing the gender balance too far in favor of women. However, it must be noted that women primarily study the social sciences, while men study engineering.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/778-0-trend-of-women-as-the-majority-of-talented-will-continue.html

Thirty-Three Years of Women in S&E Faculty Positions

The relatively low proportion of women in academic science and engineering (S&E) has been the topic of numerous recent books, reports, and workshops. Data for 2006 show that women continue to constitute a much lower percentage of S&E full professors than their share of S&E doctorates awarded in that year. Even in psychology, a field heavily dominated by women, women were less than half of all full professors, even though they earned well more than half of doctorates in 2006.

URL: 
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf08308/

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 17.2368" N, 74° 0' 26.0784" W

Kyla Bender-Baird, Research and Programs Manager, is providing the Council with a wide range of research and communications support. She received a BA in Sociology from Principia College and an MS in Women’s Studies from Towson University. Her thesis focused on transgender experiences of employment discrimination. During her time at Towson University, Kyla was a graduate assistant with the Institute for Teaching and Research on Women. On completion of her master’s degree, Kyla served as a Vaid Fellow with the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute. Kyla first joined the Council as a research consultant for The Big Five initiative. She has interned previously with Planned Parenthood and the Gender Public Advocacy Coalition.

Location

New York, NY 10005
United States
40° 42' 17.2368" N, 74° 0' 26.0784" W

Top Organizations Preparing Our Future Female Leaders

The Glass Hammer, January 14th, 2010

Jacqueline B. Libster (New York City)

Creating workforce gender equality is a multifaceted project, including the work to help women at the top right now, as well as planting the seeds for success for future generations. That’s why many organizations are working to help girls and young women develop leadership skills that will carry them from the classroom to the boardroom, by:

Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine and Engineering

Professor Londa Schiebinger looks at new solutions in science, medicine and engineering. These solutions move beyond looking at gender bias to understanding how gender functions during the creation process.  
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