Girls & STEM

Seemingly countless opportunities exist today for young girls to excel in school. However, as they progress into middle and high school, gender differences in attitudes towards STEM disciplines begin to emerge. The relatively low number of girls opting to take advanced technology and science courses leaves them less prepared for pursuing these disciplines and restricts certain career choices later on. Enrollment in advanced math courses has been equalized in high schools, resulting in less gender differences in performance on standardized math tests. However, only 17 percent of high school girls take computer science Advanced Placement exams. Educators need to encourage girls to participate more in science and technology-related programs and activities.

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership 2011

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02/28/2011

 

 

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership:
NCRW 2011 Afternoon Program

Please join the National Council for Research on Women and a panel of visionary leaders for an in-depth exploration of the most pressing issues of our time. This year’s program, Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership, will grapple with the uneven progress women are making both educationally and in their career trajectory:

Gender differences in two decision-making tasks in a community sample of adolescents

In adolescence, externalized problems such as risk taking and antisocial behavior are more frequent in boys. This suggests that there are differences in the way boys and girls evaluate risk and make decisions during this period. To explore decision making and highlight possible gender differences, 124 adolescents at a junior secondary school completed two decision-making tasks: The Iowa Gambling Task (Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994) and the Rogers Betting Task (Rogers et al., 1999).

URL: 
http://jbd.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/30/4/352

Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

In an era when women are increasingly prominent in medicine, law and business, why are there so few women scientists and engineers? A new research report by AAUW presents compelling evidence that can help to explain this puzzle. Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics presents in-depth yet accessible profiles of eight key research findings that point to environmental and social barriers – including stereotypes, gender bias and the climate of science and engineering departments in colleges and universities – that continue to block women’s participation and progress in science, technology, engineering, and math. The report also includes up to date statistics on girls' and women's achievement and participation in these areas and offers new ideas for what each of us can do to more fully open scientific and engineering fields to girls and women.

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/resource/why-so-few-women-in-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics/

ING Foundation and Girls Inc. Launch Innovative Investment Challenge for Girls Ages 12-18

New York, NY — February 12, 2009

Girls’ Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment, and Economic Growth

Much has been done to increase gender equality in education over the past 15 years. National governments and the international community have followed through on promises made in various international forums to increase investments in girls’ education. Overall female enrollment at the primary level in low-income countries has accordingly grown from 87 percent in 1990 to 94 percent in 2004, considerably shrinking the gender gap. This progress is the result of recognition of centrality of girls’ education in development and the overall progress made under the Education for All (EFA) agenda.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-1099080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf
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