Girls & STEM

Seemingly countless opportunities exist today for young girls to excel in school. However, as they progress into middle and high school, gender differences in attitudes towards STEM disciplines begin to emerge. The relatively low number of girls opting to take advanced technology and science courses leaves them less prepared for pursuing these disciplines and restricts certain career choices later on. Enrollment in advanced math courses has been equalized in high schools, resulting in less gender differences in performance on standardized math tests. However, only 17 percent of high school girls take computer science Advanced Placement exams. Educators need to encourage girls to participate more in science and technology-related programs and activities.

Girls’ Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment, and Economic Growth

Much has been done to increase gender equality in education over the past 15 years. National governments and the international community have followed through on promises made in various international forums to increase investments in girls’ education. Overall female enrollment at the primary level in low-income countries has accordingly grown from 87 percent in 1990 to 94 percent in 2004, considerably shrinking the gender gap. This progress is the result of recognition of centrality of girls’ education in development and the overall progress made under the Education for All (EFA) agenda.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-1099080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf

A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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STEM Education Must Include Women, Says President Obama

November 30, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

This morning, I ran across a White House press release on a new STEM initiative the Obama administration is launching. According to the release, women and STEM are part of Obama’s three priorities for STEM education:


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“Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy,” Susan Kaufmann (2008)

"Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy," Susan Kaufmann (2008), explores barriers girls and women experience while outlining actions that state and federal government, local school boards, colleges and universities, and Michigan families can take to ensure that women take their full place in the highly-trained technology workforce.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/
Member Organization: 

The Center’s program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS)

The Center's program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS) was featured in a recent addition of the Atlanta Journal Constitution. The front-page article featured Inman Middle School's GEMS club. The middle schoolers work with students from Georgia Tech's Center for the Study of Women, Science & Technology. The article can be found here:

URL: 
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/stories/2009/02/09/girlscience0209.html

Women's Research & Resource Center

The Spelman College Women’s Research & Resource Center embraces our unique identity and claims our pioneering role among historically Black and women’s colleges firmly rooted in the liberal arts tradition. We are committed to creating a global community of progressive women and men who envision a world free from injustice, exploitation, violence, poverty, waste, greed, illness, and misogyny. We are especially opposed to practices and images that debase African American and other women of color. 

Through curricular innovation, scholarship, activism and collaborations, the Women’s Center is educating future generation of free-thinking, unapologetic Black women who will document our stories, advocate for our rights, and join with others in the ongoing struggle to transform our communities and rescue the planet!

Principal Staff

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: bsheftal@spelman.edu

M. Bahati Kuumba, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: kuumba@spelman.edu

Ayoka Chenzira, Director of Digital Moving Salon
E-mail: chenzira@spelman.edu

Lillie Picard, Administrative Assistant
Ph. (404) 270-5625
E-mail: lpicard@spelman.edu

Dana Pride Jones, Program Coordinator
Ph. (404) 270-5627
E-mail: dpjones@spelman.edu
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Another premier component of the program is the Digital Moving Image Salon, which teaches students how to make films. Launched in 2004 by Dr. Ayoka Chenzira, an award-winning, internationally acclaimed film and video digital media artist, and the College’s first Cosby Chair, DMIS serves as a learning space, training ground, and production studio for students interested in documentary film making and digital media productions.
 
Juliana Montgomery graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in film studies from Spelman in 2006. She has the distinction of being Spelman's first graduate in the independent major she created, and was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Among the works that she associate produced was the 2009 Emmy Award-winning Coca-Cola advertisement, “Heist.”
“Spelman’s comparative women’s studies department not only supported my independent major and course of study, it made possible an environment through which my understanding of images of women – especially of women of color – within the visual media, could be realized,” said Montgomery.

Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference

Named for feminist author, scholar, activist and filmmaker Toni Cade Bambara, the conference acknowledges her legacy of scholarship and social activism.

“Year after year we’ve been able to motivate students to engage in creative ways to celebrate the life and legacy of one of our most important sheroes,” said Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center. “No one else remembers Toni Cade Bambara annually in the ways we do, and for that, I am sure the people she impacted for so many years, including me, are very grateful.”
 
The two-day conference is developed and facilitated by Spelman students who are led by Bahati Kuumba, Ph.D., associate professor of women's studies, and associate director of the Women's Research and Resource Center. It features paper presentations, workshops and performance pieces that delve into dimensions of Black/African women’s lives, scholarship and social change activism.

"The conference brings awareness to issues related to women of African descent and women of color who have been actively engaged in using their knowledge and organizational skills to forward social justice," said Kuumba.

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Wellesley Centers for Women

At the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), Wellesley College, we believe that disciplined, relevant research and theory paired with innovative training and action programs are key building blocks for social progress.
 
Since 1974, WCW has conducted interdisciplinary studies on issues such as: gender equity in education, sexual harassment in schools, child care, adolescent development, gender violence, and women’s leadership—studies that have influenced private practices and public policy.
 
WCW staff members provide professional development for educators, child caregivers, and youth workers that encourage children’s social-emotional development and enhance learning environments and safety.
 
Other WCW scholars have dedicated themselves to the prevention of psychological problems, the enhancement of psychological well-being, and the search for a more comprehensive understanding of human deve

Contact

106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481-8203
Ph. 781-283-2500
Fx. 781-283-2504
http://www.wcwonline.org
newswcw@wellesley.edu


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Child and Adolescent Development

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research studies and evaluations on issues related to child and adolescent development, including issues around race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and identity; the effects of early child care; the value of physical activity; preventing depression; examining unique family dynamics; and exploring sexuality and evaluating sex-education programming.

Childcare

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have studied the ability of public schools to prepare young children for lifelong learning and have shaped local, state, and federal policies. Our groundbreaking research, policy development, and training programs set the standards for out-of-school time, and continue to inform the field in new areas, including physical activity programming.

 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) have conducted research on a range of educational issues, including quality early education; equitable opportunities in STEM fields and literacy; and bullying prevention and sex-education programming. Scholars and trainers from WCW have also developed curricula and facilitated programs that promote equity and diversity and social-emotional learning in educational settings. Our research has raised public consciousness about serious education issues and has informed public policy.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted numerous research studies on issues related to gender violence, including bullying- and sexual harassment-prevention programs in schools, and patterns of and interventions for intimate partner violence, including family violence and teen dating violence.
 
 
Work by scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women led to Relational-Cultural Theory, an understanding that has dramatically changed counseling and psychotherapy practices. Through training institutes, this work continues to be developed and implemented. Researchers committed to the prevention of depression in at-risk youth have undertaken studies to identify effective intervention programming for adolescents and families. Trainers and educators at the Centers develop curricula and facilitate training to promote social-emotional learning in elementary schools.
 
 
Scholars are the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research on economic implications of public policy; undertaken studies and audits; facilitated network building; and produced valuable resources for advocates, policy makers, and legal professionals in the U.S. and abroad. This work covers a broad range of issues related to the social and economic development of women, children, and persons with disabilities.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers undertake research initiatives that explore issues affecting work/life balance, including child care, work-leave policies, and gender roles. Research and action programs that address women’s leadership inform business practice and policy in the U.S. and within our global-network-partner communities. The Women’s Review of Books, a special publication of the Centers, puts women’s perspectives and voices at the center of literary contributions.

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