Barriers & Challenges to Advancement

The stigma for women to pursue STEM careers starts at an early age. Stereotypes about the difficulty of certain subjects and subtle cultural and societal cues about “masculine” and “feminine” subject matter discourage girls from pursuing these studies. Also, technology toys and video games tend to be designed and marketed for boys rather than girls. According to the National Center for Women and Information Technology, high school girls associate computer science with “male geeks,” and tend to avoid science and technology clubs and activities. In higher education and STEM careers, women often report feeling isolated, marginalized and hampered by a lack of female mentors and role models. More effort is needed to encourage women to pursue advanced studies and careers in STEM through networking, hiring more women into positions of seniority and instituting parent-friendly advanced degree programs and research projects.

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for women in Science, Engineering, and Technology.   

The Gannon Center and EVOKE present Half the Sky with Sheryl WuDunn

Date/Time: 
03/23/2010

The 2010 Ann F. Baum Women and Leadership Speaker Series

 

More women in finance, a more sustainable economy

As has been pointed out with increasing frequency, a certain group think has been widely blamed for the economic crisis we find ourselves in today. Studies indicate that women are more comprehensive thinkers and less attracted to excessive risk than are their male peers.
 

URL: 
http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Opinion/2009/0624/p09s02-coop.html

The Ever Increasing Majority of Women Graduates

According to a recent OECD report, Higher Education to 2030, women will become an even larger majority of the graduate talent pool in only one decade. Companies are already having to ensure that they don’t swing the gender balance too far in favor of women. However, it must be noted that women primarily study the social sciences, while men study engineering.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/778-0-trend-of-women-as-the-majority-of-talented-will-continue.html

Thirty-Three Years of Women in S&E Faculty Positions

The relatively low proportion of women in academic science and engineering (S&E) has been the topic of numerous recent books, reports, and workshops. Data for 2006 show that women continue to constitute a much lower percentage of S&E full professors than their share of S&E doctorates awarded in that year. Even in psychology, a field heavily dominated by women, women were less than half of all full professors, even though they earned well more than half of doctorates in 2006.

URL: 
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf08308/

Stanford Researcher Urges Universities, Businesses to Offer Benefit To Pay For Housework

Member Organization: 
Clayman Institute for Gender Research

by Adam Gorlick on 01/19/10

Originally posted in the Stanford Report January 19, 2010

Professor Londa SchiebingerLonda Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 13.932" N, 74° 0' 49.8744" W

Silvia Henriquez is responsible for the overall management, fundraising and administration of the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health. Silvia has positioned NLIRH as one of the leading organizations working to advance the reproductive health and rights of Latinas. Within the first two years of her tenure, she increased national visibility through the 2004 March for Women’s Lives and the National Latina Summit. Subsequently under her leadership, NLIRH has developed a successful organizing and leadership development training curriculum, a national policy agenda and built coalitions with state and national partners that advance a reproductive justice advocacy effort. Through her work at NLIRH, Silvia has published articles in “Social Policy, Organizing for Social and Economic Justice and Democratic Participation” and “Conscience, The Newsjournal of Catholic Opinion.”

Location

New York, NY 10004
United States
40° 42' 13.932" N, 74° 0' 49.8744" W
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