Barriers & Challenges to Advancement

The stigma for women to pursue STEM careers starts at an early age. Stereotypes about the difficulty of certain subjects and subtle cultural and societal cues about “masculine” and “feminine” subject matter discourage girls from pursuing these studies. Also, technology toys and video games tend to be designed and marketed for boys rather than girls. According to the National Center for Women and Information Technology, high school girls associate computer science with “male geeks,” and tend to avoid science and technology clubs and activities. In higher education and STEM careers, women often report feeling isolated, marginalized and hampered by a lack of female mentors and role models. More effort is needed to encourage women to pursue advanced studies and careers in STEM through networking, hiring more women into positions of seniority and instituting parent-friendly advanced degree programs and research projects.

Stanford researcher urges universities, businesses to offer benefit to pay for housework

January 20, 2010 posted by admin

Originally posted by Adam Gorlick January 19, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Londa Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.


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A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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Women Use Science, Engineering, to Pierce Vitreous Ceiling

Office of Science and Technology Policy
It was a record-breaking year for women in science, as anyone who tracked the Nobel Prizes knows. But the struggle to attract and retain more girls and women to careers in science, math, and engineering is far from over. That’s why the Obama administration is pursuing a number of strategies aimed at getting ever more women to join the scientific ranks in the years and decades ahead.
 

URL: 
http://blog.ostp.gov/2009/10/20/women-use-science-engineering-to-pierce-vitreous-ceiling/

Resources: Business Schools Sweeten Lures for Women

Business schools are trying to boost stubbornly low rates of female enrollment. New York University's program, which has the highest proportion of women among co-ed programs, is only 40 percent female.

URL: 
http://www.womensenews.org/story/business/100121/business-schools-sweeten-lures-women

“Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy,” Susan Kaufmann (2008)

"Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy," Susan Kaufmann (2008), explores barriers girls and women experience while outlining actions that state and federal government, local school boards, colleges and universities, and Michigan families can take to ensure that women take their full place in the highly-trained technology workforce.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/
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