Successful Strategies & Programs

NCRW’s 2001 publication, Balancing the Equation: Where Are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering and Technology? features many recommendations that form the basis of successful programs. The National Science Foundation and others have applied many of the same findings to develop successful programs and strategies. One of the most important features of successful STEM programs is building mentoring relationships between accomplished women STEM professionals and young women at different stages of study or career. MIT and the Mathematical Association of America have created such mentoring programs. In primary and secondary schools, hands-on courses encouraging students to design their own websites or create their own tech toys have been incredibly effective in capturing the interest of girls and young women. Girls Incorporated, an NCRW member center, sponsors TeachingSMART, a program that increases awareness of gender issues among elementary and high school teachers. The Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology at Georgia Tech (also an NCRW member) offers support services to women scholars and engineers. And the National Science Foundation is making substantial investments through its ADVANCE Program aimed at increasing the number of women in STEM.

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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National Coalition of Girls' Schools

The National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) is a leading advocate for girls’ education with a distinct commitment to the transformative power of all-girls schools. The Coalition acts at the forefront of educational thought, collaborating and connecting globally with individuals, schools, and organizations dedicated to empowering girls to be influential contributors to the world.

Contact

PO Box 5729
Charlottesville, VA 22905
Ph. 434-205-4496
Fx. 434-205-4486
http://www.ncgs.org/



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Principal Staff

Megan Murphy, Executive Director
E-mail: mmurphy@ncgs.org

Leslie Coles, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Programs
E-mail: lcoles@ncgs.org

Olivia Haas, Director of Strategic Communication & Research
E-mail: ohaas@ncgs.org

Paige Rannigan, Director of Member & Administrative Services
E-mail: prannigan@ncgs.org
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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Dr. Mariko Chang is the author of the new book, Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, and the main author of the March 2010 report “Lifting as We Climb Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future.” Dr. Chang has a PhD in Sociology from Stanford University and was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University from 1998 to 2007 where she published work on occupational sex segregation across countries, the use of social networks for gathering financial information and began her work on the gender wealth gap. To help raise awareness of the wealth gap, she maintains a website that provides data and other information on wealth, assets, and debt for public policy makers, the media, researchers, and organizations that address economic security.
 

Location

Boston, MA
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Senior Technical Women: A Profile of Success

A growing body of research has documented the underrepresentation of women in technical positions in US companies. Women hold 24 percent of technology jobs, yet represent half the total workforce. This underrepresentation persists even though the demand for technical talent remains high: computer occupations are expected to grow by 32 percent between 2008 and 2018.

In 2008, the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology and the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University conducted a survey of 1,795 technical men and women at seven high-technology companies in Silicon Valley. In this paper, we focus on senior technical women, who at only 4 percent of our sample represent a rarity in the technology industry.

URL: 
http://anitaborg.org/files/Senior-Technical-Women-A-Profile-of-Success.pdf

Malaysian women redefine gender roles in technology

By Ruth Schechter

Originally posted February 8, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

According to national studies, women hold more than half of all professional occupations in the U.S. but fewer than 24 percent of all computing-related occupations, representing a huge pool of untapped talent. The numbers are not moving in favor of increasing women’s participation in technology; in 2008 women earned only 18 percent of all computer science degrees. Back in 1985, women earned 37 percent of CS degrees, nearly double today’s share.


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ING Foundation and Girls Inc. Launch Innovative Investment Challenge for Girls Ages 12-18

Member Organization: 
Girls Incorporated

New York, NY — February 12, 2009

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 51.3684" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W
Member Organizations: 

Leslye E. Orloff is vice president and director of Legal Momentum's Immigrant Women Program. She joined Legal Momentum's Washington, D.C. office in September 1999 to found and direct the Immigrant Women Program (IWP) which advocates for laws, policies and practices that enhance the legal rights of immigrant women and immigrant victims of violence against women. IWP focuses on improved access to immigration benefits, the justice system, public benefits, social services and health care.

Location

New York, NY
United States
40° 42' 51.3684" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W

A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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