Building Pipelines

NCRW is continuing to identify best practices and optimal strategies for building pipelines to encourage women and girls’ advancement in the STEM fields. Pipeline programs, such as Girls Inc.’s after-school Operation SMART and MIT’s Women’s Techno logy Program are prime examples of initiatives that work under the assumption that girls are interested in math, science and technology. Mentoring programs are also becoming increasingly common in academic, advocacy and business sectors to strengthen the leadership pipeline. Women mentors serve as role models who reinforce young women’s perceptions of their own potential to advance in their studies and careers. Effective pipeline programs rely on partnerships across organizations and sectors, such as the STEM Accelerator Initiative administered by the National Alliance of State Science and Mathematics Coalitions.

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“False Start: A Missed Opportunity for Women and Girls in STEM in the Race to the Top Awards”

COCHRANVILLE, PA (3/29/11)

NAPE Report Indicates Missed Opportunity to Prepare Women and Girls for STEM Careers

URL: 
http://www.ncrw.org/content/false-start-missed-opportunity-women-and-girls-stem-race-top-awards

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences

Premier science largely depends on the quality of the pool of future scientists. For this reason the United States has made a major effort over the past 30 years to attract more outstanding U.S. students, particularly women, into research science. Women have risen to the challenge with significant increases in all physical sciences and engineering, and they have made a huge advance in the life sciences, where they now receive more than 50 percent of all Ph.D.s. Women now represent a large part of the talent pool for research science, but many data sources indicate that they are more likely than men to “leak” out of the pipeline in the sciences before obtaining tenure at a college or university. The loss of these women, together with serious increases in European and Asian nations’ capacity for research, means the long-term dependability of a highly trained U.S. workforce and global preeminence in the sciences may be in question. 

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership 2011

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02/28/2011

 

 

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership:
NCRW 2011 Afternoon Program

Please join the National Council for Research on Women and a panel of visionary leaders for an in-depth exploration of the most pressing issues of our time. This year’s program, Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership, will grapple with the uneven progress women are making both educationally and in their career trajectory:

Women in IT: The Facts (2009)

The technology industry is one of the fastest-growing industries in the U.S.  The United States Department of Labor estimates that by 2016 there will be more than 1.5 million computer-related jobs available. Technology job opportunities are predicted to grow at a faster rate than jobs in all other professional sectors, or up to 25 percent over the next decade.

Highly-qualified women are well-positioned to move into these open jobs, yet the industry is failing to attract this talent. Furthermore, women already employed in the technology industry are leaving at staggering rates. Failing to capitalize on this talent threatens U.S. productivity, innovation, and competitiveness. To further strengthen the U.S. position as a technical leader we need to examine the reasons why the industry is not attracting more people with varied backgrounds and take action to stem the current tide.

URL: 
http://www.ncwit.org/pdf/NCWIT_WomenInITFacts_FINAL.pdf
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