Women's Leadership

Women with successful careers in science, industry and technology provide important examples to those considering careers in STEM-related fields. Women scientists, engineers and corporate leaders are becoming increasingly involved in pipeline-building programs and networks. Professional associations such as the Association for Women in Science, and the Society of Women Engineers are key examples of programs that are building women’s leadership. Leaders of academic institutions, corporations and non-profits in STEM need to model inclusive hiring and promotional practices and develop an organizational culture that fosters positive attitudes towards women’s advancement. Such leadership encourages a culture of diversity and inclusiveness for replication by middle and senior management.

“False Start: A Missed Opportunity for Women and Girls in STEM in the Race to the Top Awards”

COCHRANVILLE, PA (3/29/11)

NAPE Report Indicates Missed Opportunity to Prepare Women and Girls for STEM Careers

URL: 
http://www.ncrw.org/content/false-start-missed-opportunity-women-and-girls-stem-race-top-awards

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership

Female students have now surpassed their male peers in high school and college graduation rates. Yet across sectors, women’s representation in professional leadership roles has stalled at 15-17%. If women make up the majority of students earning Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees why are there so few women in top management positions? Further aggravating women’s uneven progress, the disparity is often most pronounced in the most lucrative fields, especially STEM, economics, and finance. 

National Coalition of Girls' Schools

The National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) is a leading advocate for girls’ education with a distinct commitment to the transformative power of all-girls schools. The Coalition acts at the forefront of educational thought, collaborating and connecting globally with individuals, schools, and organizations dedicated to empowering girls to be influential contributors to the world.

Contact

PO Box 5729
Charlottesville, VA 22905
Ph. 434-205-4496
Fx. 434-205-4486
http://www.ncgs.org/



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Principal Staff

Megan Murphy, Executive Director
E-mail: mmurphy@ncgs.org

Leslie Coles, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Programs
E-mail: lcoles@ncgs.org

Olivia Haas, Director of Strategic Communication & Research
E-mail: ohaas@ncgs.org

Paige Rannigan, Director of Member & Administrative Services
E-mail: prannigan@ncgs.org
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Staying Competitive: Patching America's Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences

Premier science largely depends on the quality of the pool of future scientists. For this reason the United States has made a major effort over the past 30 years to attract more outstanding U.S. students, particularly women, into research science. Women have risen to the challenge with significant increases in all physical sciences and engineering, and they have made a huge advance in the life sciences, where they now receive more than 50 percent of all Ph.D.s. Women now represent a large part of the talent pool for research science, but many data sources indicate that they are more likely than men to “leak” out of the pipeline in the sciences before obtaining tenure at a college or university. The loss of these women, together with serious increases in European and Asian nations’ capacity for research, means the long-term dependability of a highly trained U.S. workforce and global preeminence in the sciences may be in question. 

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html

Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership

Female students have long surpassed their male peers in the rates at which they seek higher education. Yet across sectors, women’s representation in professional leadership roles has stalled at 15-17%. If women make up the majority of students earning Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees why are there so few women in top management positions? Further aggravating women’s uneven progress, the disparity is often most pronounced in the most lucrative fields, including STEM, economics and finance. 


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Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership 2011

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02/28/2011

 

 

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership:
NCRW 2011 Afternoon Program

Please join the National Council for Research on Women and a panel of visionary leaders for an in-depth exploration of the most pressing issues of our time. This year’s program, Building a Pipeline to Women’s Leadership, will grapple with the uneven progress women are making both educationally and in their career trajectory:

Emilie and the Scientific Community

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

I am finished writing and thinking about socially conservative Texans (for now). But I still have history texts on the mind.

Here’s the dilemma: in a conversation with a like-minded male progressive, I was surprised to realize that, while sympathetic to the fact that girls have few female role models to read about in school, he didn’t see an obvious solution. He thought maybe a few more women could be highlighted, but he offered the following to explain why men would continue to outnumber women in the texts for years to come:


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Emerging Leaders Network Wine Tasting

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06/15/2010

The Emerging Leaders Network of the National Council for Research on Women invites you to an exclusive networking and wine tasting event for young professional women in New York City.  Tuesday, June 15, 6:00pm--8:00pm,

Bottle Rocket, 5 W. 19th Street, (between 5th and 6th Aves.)

The Emerging Leaders Network supports entry to mid-level professionals in their efforts to develop leadership skills and build partnerships.  The Network is currently developing programs relevant to both the corporate and nonprofit sectors.

Entry fee for the Emerging Leaders Wine Tasting is $25 per person, payable in advance, by check or credit card, or payable by cash, check or credit card the night of the event.

Please RSVP to Lisa Rast via email at Lrast@regender.org, or fax to (212)785-7350. 

Checks should be made payable to: NCRW

 

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