Women's Leadership

Women with successful careers in science, industry and technology provide important examples to those considering careers in STEM-related fields. Women scientists, engineers and corporate leaders are becoming increasingly involved in pipeline-building programs and networks. Professional associations such as the Association for Women in Science, and the Society of Women Engineers are key examples of programs that are building women’s leadership. Leaders of academic institutions, corporations and non-profits in STEM need to model inclusive hiring and promotional practices and develop an organizational culture that fosters positive attitudes towards women’s advancement. Such leadership encourages a culture of diversity and inclusiveness for replication by middle and senior management.

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology

Conversation with Debra Facktor Lepore: Challenges for women in Science, Engineering, and Technology.   

Malaysian women redefine gender roles in technology

By Ruth Schechter

Originally posted February 8, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

According to national studies, women hold more than half of all professional occupations in the U.S. but fewer than 24 percent of all computing-related occupations, representing a huge pool of untapped talent. The numbers are not moving in favor of increasing women’s participation in technology; in 2008 women earned only 18 percent of all computer science degrees. Back in 1985, women earned 37 percent of CS degrees, nearly double today’s share.


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Thirty-Three Years of Women in S&E Faculty Positions

The relatively low proportion of women in academic science and engineering (S&E) has been the topic of numerous recent books, reports, and workshops. Data for 2006 show that women continue to constitute a much lower percentage of S&E full professors than their share of S&E doctorates awarded in that year. Even in psychology, a field heavily dominated by women, women were less than half of all full professors, even though they earned well more than half of doctorates in 2006.

URL: 
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf08308/

Top Organizations Preparing Our Future Female Leaders

The Glass Hammer, January 14th, 2010

Jacqueline B. Libster (New York City)

Creating workforce gender equality is a multifaceted project, including the work to help women at the top right now, as well as planting the seeds for success for future generations. That’s why many organizations are working to help girls and young women develop leadership skills that will carry them from the classroom to the boardroom, by:

Stanford Researcher Urges Universities, Businesses to Offer Benefit To Pay For Housework

Member Organization: 
Clayman Institute for Gender Research

by Adam Gorlick on 01/19/10

Originally posted in the Stanford Report January 19, 2010

Professor Londa SchiebingerLonda Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 29' 10.3776" N, 74° 27' 6.5484" W

Ruth B. Mandel is Board of Governors Professor of Politics at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Since 1995, she has been Director of the Eagleton Institute of Politics, the unit of Rutgers University that explores state and national politics and government through research and education and links the study of politics with its day-to-day practice.

From 1971 through 1994, Mandel developed and directed Eagleton's Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), where she remains affiliated as a Senior Scholar. Mandel teaches and writes about leadership, with emphasis on U.S. women's political history, women as political candidates and officeholders, women's political networks, and the "gender gap." She is the author of numerous publications about women's changing political roles.
 

Location

New Brunswick, NJ 08901
United States
40° 29' 10.3776" N, 74° 27' 6.5484" W

Stanford researcher urges universities, businesses to offer benefit to pay for housework

January 20, 2010 posted by admin

Originally posted by Adam Gorlick January 19, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Londa Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.


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