Women's Leadership

Women with successful careers in science, industry and technology provide important examples to those considering careers in STEM-related fields. Women scientists, engineers and corporate leaders are becoming increasingly involved in pipeline-building programs and networks. Professional associations such as the Association for Women in Science, and the Society of Women Engineers are key examples of programs that are building women’s leadership. Leaders of academic institutions, corporations and non-profits in STEM need to model inclusive hiring and promotional practices and develop an organizational culture that fosters positive attitudes towards women’s advancement. Such leadership encourages a culture of diversity and inclusiveness for replication by middle and senior management.

A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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Women Use Science, Engineering, to Pierce Vitreous Ceiling

Office of Science and Technology Policy
It was a record-breaking year for women in science, as anyone who tracked the Nobel Prizes knows. But the struggle to attract and retain more girls and women to careers in science, math, and engineering is far from over. That’s why the Obama administration is pursuing a number of strategies aimed at getting ever more women to join the scientific ranks in the years and decades ahead.
 

URL: 
http://blog.ostp.gov/2009/10/20/women-use-science-engineering-to-pierce-vitreous-ceiling/

University of Arizona Southwest Institute for Research on Women

Established at the University of Arizona in 1976 the University of Arizona's Women in Science and Technology (WISE) program encourages women to become leaders in the fields of science and technology. More information can be found here: http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

URL: 
http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W
Member Organizations: 

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action

By Karen O’Connor*

One need only look to the Declaration of Sentiments adopted by the women in attendance at the Seneca Falls Convention in August 1848 to begin to appreciate how far women in the United States still are from reaching equality in a host of arenas, many of which are dependent on political or legal equality. Although women were granted the franchise in 1920 after decades of struggle, it is only in the past few decades that women have become a political force – at least at the ballot box. Women not only vote more than men, but unmarried women and women of color are much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. In fact, women were key voters in the successful elections of Presidents Clinton and Obama.


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Center for the Study of Women in Society

The University of Oregon's Center for the Study of Women in Society promotes research on the complexity of women’s lives and the intersecting nature of gender identities and inequalities. Faculty and graduate students affiliated with the Center generate and share this research with other scholars and educators, the public, policymakers, and activists. CSWS researchers come from a broad range of fields in arts and humanities, law and policy, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and the professional schools.

CSWS Mission
Generating, supporting and disseminating research on the complexity of women’s lives and the intersecting nature of gender identities and inequalities.

Contact

1201 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
Ph. 541-346-5015
Fx. 541-346-5096
http://csws.uoregon.edu
csws@uoregon.edu


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Principal Staff

Carol Stabile, Director
Ph. (541) 346-5524
E-mail: cstabile@uoregon.edu

Gabriela Martínez, Associate Director, Coordinator of Women of Color Project
E-mail: Gmartine@uoregon.edu

Alice Evans, Communications
Ph. (541) 346-5077
E-mail: alicee@uoregon.edu

Peggy McConnell, Accounting and Grants
Ph. (541) 346-2262
E-mail: peggym@uoregon.edu

Pam Sutton, Office and Events Coordinator
Ph. (541) 346-5015
E-mail: csws@uoregon.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Research Interest Groups. Research Interest Groups (RIG) organized by CSWS foster collaboration between scholars at the university. Faculty, graduate students, and community members participate in programs and events. RIGs are designed to facilitate collaborative research; create support groups for the preparation of grant proposals; build better connections between scholars and community activists; and generate opportunities for cross-disciplinary dialogue among scholars.

Women of Color Project

CSWS was awarded a Ford Foundation grant in March 2008 from the National Council for Research on Women (NCRW). “Diversifying the Leadership of Women’s Research Centers,” was meant to promote the leadership of women of color from historically underrepresented groups in the United States within NCRW and within its women’s research, policy, and advocacy member centers. CSWS and the UO Office of the Vice President for Research provided matching funds.

Charise Cheney, associate professor, UO Department of Ethnic Studies, continues as the 2012-13 coordinator of the CSWS Women of Color Project. Cheney’s research interests include African-American popular and political cultures, black nationalist ideologies and practices, and gender and sexuality. She is the author of Brothers Gonna Work It Out: Sexual Politics in the Golden Age of Rap Nationalism (New York: New York University Press, 2005) and is currently working on a book about black resistance to school desegregation in Topeka, Kansas in the decade before Brown v Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. She earned her PhD at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

Fembot Project

Designed to re-imagine academic writing and research, the Fembot Project participates in the ongoing revolution in academic publishing, taking seriously the advice of scholars to democratize our publications by embracing open access, open source publications. The Fembot Project centrally includes a new journal—Ada: Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology—that will be broadly accessible, both in terms of physical access and in terms of its content. The Fembot website comprises three overlapping projects: Ada, Laundry Day, and a professional clearinghouse.

Women Writers Project

This group organized MemoirFest, the first annual CSWS Women Writers Symposium, held May 12, 2012. The second annual CSWS Women Writers Symposium: Common Ground, was held over Mother’s Day weekend 2013. The Women Writers Project seeks to foster and enhance opportunities for women writers on campus, in the community, and throughout the Pacific Northwest; to bring distinct voices of published women writers to campus; and to support the work of creative writing by bringing together writers from different disciplines.


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Reports & Resources

2012 CSWS Annual Review

CSWS Research Matters is published three times yearly. Each two-page article is written by a UO faculty member whose research has been supported by CSWS.

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Sandra Morgen; Joan Acker; Jill Weigt. 2010.Stretched Thin: Poor Families, Welfare Work, and Welfare Reform. Cornell University Press.

Pascoe, Peggy. 2009. What Comes Naturally: Miscegenation Law and the Making of Race in America. Oxford.

Reis, Elizabeth. 2009. Bodies in Doubt: An American History of Intersex. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Lynn Fujiwara. 2008. Mothers without Citizenship: Asian Immigrant Families and the Consequences of Welfare Reform. University of Minnesota Press.

Microfinance

Lamia Karim, 2011. Microfinance and Its Discontents: Women in Debt in Bangladesh. University of Minnesota Press. Lamia Karim is the associate director of the Center for the Study of Women in Society and an associate professor in the University of Oregon Department of Anthropology.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Grants and Fellowships

The Center for the Study of Women in Society maintains a number of grant programs to support the work initiated by University of Oregon faculty, staff (with the appropriate end degrees), and graduate students. By providing these highly competitive grants and fellowships, CSWS consistently has supported many important research projects at various stages of development and enriched programs in all sectors of the university. The Center has offered research funding to faculty and graduate students at the University of Oregon for more than 25 consecutive years.


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Institute for Women's Leadership

The Institute for Women's Leadership is a consortium of teaching, research, and public service units of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The institute and its members are dedicated to examining leadership issues and advancing women's leadership in all arenas of public life – locally, nationally and globally. The interaction among the member units of the consortium encourages scholarly and practical explorations of how institutions are structured by gender, race and ethnicity, socio-economic status and promotes new understanding of women's leadership for social change. 

Contact

162 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. 848-932-1463
Fx. 732-932-4739
http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~iwl
iwl@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Alison R. Bernstein, Director
Ph. (848) 932-8444
E-mail: arb179@rci.rutgers.edu

Lisa Hetfield, Associate Director and Director of Development
Ph. (848) 932-8447
E-mail: lisahet@rci.rutgers.edu

Mary K. Trigg, Director of Leadership Programs and Research
Ph. (848) 932-8456
E-mail: trigg@rci.rutgers.edu

Connie A. Ellis, Corporate Programs Director
Ph. (848) 932-8457
E-mail: ellisc@rci.rutgers.edu

Sasha Wood Taner, Associate Director, Leadership Programs and Research
Ph. (848) 932-8458
E-mail: sdwood@rci.rutgers.edu

Gail Reilly, Department Administrator
Ph. (848) 932-8449
E-mail: gareilly@rci.rutgers.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

WINGS

Eight-month, memntoring program that  links Rutgers undergraduates with senior professional women.  

CLASP

Five-week, Rutgers undergraduate summer service-learning program which places students in social justice internships.

Visiting Scholars Program

Programs sponsored by the institute and consortium members for guest scholars, researchers, and others to visit Rutgers.

Executive Leadership Program

Intensive workshop series for women leaders holding senior-level positions in industry, the professions and nonprofit organizations.

Leadership Scholars Program

Two-year, 19 credit Rutgers undergraduate certificate program in women's leadership.


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Reports & Resources

Books and Monographs 

Mary S. Hartman, ed., Talking Leadership: Conversations with Powerful Women (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1999). 

Winnifred R. Brown-Glaude, ed., Doing Diversity in Higher Education: Faculty Leaders Share Challenges and Strategies (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2008). 

Mary K. Trigg, ed., Leading the Way: Young Women's Activism for Social Change (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2010). 

Reports

Women Leaders Count began as an Institute research project in 1993, was reborn in the fall of 2001 as a research partnership between Rutgers’ Institute for Women’s Leadership and the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, the Division on Women, and is once again a stand-alone research project at the IWL. The reports in the series focus on the status of New Jersey women in key areas of demographics and activism, work, education, health, poverty, the law, and violence against women. Since 2007, the Institute has published Women’s Leadership Fact Sheets as part of the project, and will continue to publish occasional reports. By bringing together available data, analyzing demographic trends, and identifying research gaps, we hope that Women Leaders Count will serve as a valuable tool to inform equitable policies and effective programs and increase public awareness of women’s leadership progress and challenges. 

Published Issues of Women Leaders Count Reports

“Challenge and Change: Younger and Older Women in New Jersey”

Focuses on factors pertinent to the lives of both younger and older women in the state and discusses how families and living arrangements, economics and work, health, education, and political participation differently affect women at various stages of their lives.

“Substance Abuse and Its Effects on Women”

In New Jersey, women make up one-third of admissions to treatment facilities for substance abuse, and the percentage of women among those incarcerated for drug-related offenses has increased. “Substance Abuse and Its Effects on Women” considers the gender-specific issues of childcare, female-headed households, and the implications these have for women’s drug abuse and recovery.

“New Jersey Women: Who Are We? How Are We Faring?”

“New Jersey Women”: Who Are We? How Are We Faring?” presents “vital statistics” on women’s status in New Jersey in the areas of population, age, immigration, marriage and marital status, families and households, education, work, and political representation, and considers future trends for women in the state.

“Boxed In and Breaking Out: New Jersey Women and Work in the 1990s”—Caroline Jacobus (November 1993)

“More and More on Their Own: Demographic Trends of New Jersey Women”—Caroline Jacobus (March 1993) 


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholars Program

Programs sponsored by the Institute and Consortium Members for guest scholars, researchers, and others to visit Rutgers.

Mary S. Hartman Women's Leadership Opportunity Fund at the Institute for Women's Leadership

The purpose of this Fund is to provide Rutgers undergraduate students with opportunities to expand their education beyond the classroom through academic conferences, internships, research experiences, national summit meetings, leadership training, and skills workshops.


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