Leadership in Civil Society

News Coverage of the Veil and the Muslim Women's Movement

December 16, 2009 posted by admin

The Christian Science Monitor featured several articles this week on the veil and the Muslim Women's Movement. They're well worth the read! From "Behind the veil: Why Islam's most visible symbol is spreading:"


<< Back to the Full Blog

Engendering Justice: Women, Prisons and Change

In the last decade, we have witnessed the population of incarcerated women increase to 400 percent. Building on this development, Rebecca Haimowitz reflects on the interlinkage between incarceration and issues such as race, class, education, national identity, and gender conformity. 

Video URL: 

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

WOMEN GO GLOBAL CD-ROM

The United Nations and the International Women's Movement 1945-2000

To mark Beijing +5, the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women have produced Women Go Global, showing how the international women's movement and the United Nations have worked side-by-side in the quest for gender equality. The multimedia presentation features milestones in the establishment of the international agenda for equality between women and men, from the creation of the United Nations in 1945 and Beijing +5 in June 2000. Kristen Timothy, Visiting Scholar at the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, undertook the substantive research that provides the basis for the program.

To order a copy of Women Go Global, click here.

 

 

Teaser: 

The United Nations and the International Women's Movement 1945-2000 To mark Beijing +5, the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women will produce a CD-Rom showing how the international women's movement and the United Nations have worked side-by-side in the quest for gender equality. Milestones in the establishment of the international agenda for equality between women and men from the creation of the United Nations in 1945 and Beijing +5 in June 2000 are featured in the multi-media presentation.

Cover Image: 

Balancing the Equation: Where are Women and Girls in Science, Engineering, and Technology?

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by NCRW, now Re:Gender network members. Also included are Recommendations, which emphasize that an increase in women and girls' participation in all levels of science, engineering and technology requires strong leadership, changes in cultural values and practices, and systemic reform.

Click here to order a copy.

Teaser: 

Balancing the Equation identifies the gains made in science, engineering and technology, the key challenges that remain, the lessons learned, and new issues that must be addressed. A Resource Guide in the report provides the reader with material to pursue further research about successful programs, many of which were established by Re:Gender network members.

TO ORDER A COPY, Download Order Form.

 

Cover Image: 

Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice

Volume 16, Number 1, March 2004

Symposium: Women, Human Security
and Globalization

Special Editor: Linda Basch, National Council for Research on Women

Contents:

Linda Basch, Human Security, Globalization, and Feminist Visions
Mary Robinson, An Ethical, Human-Rights Approach to Globalization
Kristen Timothy, Human Security Discourse at the United Nations
Sadako Ogata, The Human Security Commission's Strategy
Charlotte Bunch, A Feminist Human Rights Lens
Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, Gender, Globalization and New Threats to Human Security
J. Ann Tickner, Feminist Responses to International Security Studies
Deborah L. Rhode, Gender and the U.S. Human Rights Record
Leith Mullings, Domestic Policy and Human Security in the U.S.
Gwyn Kirk and Margo Okazawa-Rey, Women Opposing U.S. Militarism in East Asia
Sally L. Kitch and Margaret A. Mills, Appropriating Women's Agendas

Teaser: 

Symposium: Women, Human Security and Globalization

Cover Image: 

NEXT GENERATION FORUM--Turning from Fear to Hope in Politics and Leadership

December 5, 2008 posted by admin

Kyla Bender-Baird: What are your thoughts, as a young woman leader, on women, leadership and politics?


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content