Women's Movements

Women's Environment and Development Organization

As a global women’s advocacy organization, WEDO envisions a just world that promotes and protects human rights, gender equality and the integrity of the environment.
 
Mission
To contribute toward its vision for the world, WEDO’s mission is to ensure that women’s rights; social, economic and environmental justice; and sustainable development principles-as well as the linkages between them-are at the heart of global and national policies, programs and practices.
 
Approach

Contact

355 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10017
Ph. (212) 973-0325
Fx. (212) 973-0335
http://www.wedo.org
eleanor@wedo.org


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Principal Staff

Cate Owren, Executive Director

Dona Weekes, Finance Manager

Eleanor Blomstrom, Program Coordinator
Ph. (212) 973-0325 x206
E-mail: eleanor@wedo.org

Rachel Harris, Advocacy Coordinator
E-mail: rachel@wedo.org

Sandra Freitas, Policy Advisor

Bridget K. Burns, Project and Communications Coordinator

Andrea Quesada, Project Coordinator
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Women's Leadership

WEDO works to ensure women are empowered as decision-makers and leaders, especially in environmental and sustainable development arenas.
 
Across sectors and movements, WEDO has witnessed firsthand the power of women’s organizing and leadership for change – particularly in protecting and promoting a healthy, peaceful planet. Empowering women as leaders – from the personal and local to the highest decision-making levels – to advance gender equality and protect and promote a sustainable planet is a critical part of WEDO’s work.
 
WEDO joins in partnership with women’s organizations, networks, grassroots groups and activists, UN bodies and IGOs, government Ministries, parliamentarians, congresswomen and men, Heads of State and global thought leaders including academics and Nobel Laureates to promote women’s leadership. Across civil society, WEDO champions the vitality, diversity and influence of women’s organizing and movements – irreplaceable momentum toward justice and equality. And because WEDO’s goal is gender equality, WEDO proudly collaborates with men – some steadfast allies already and some seeking support to be able to become gender equality champions – toward the betterment of society as a whole.
 
 
WEDO works to ensure sustainable development policies, plans and practices are gender responsive. Sustainable development – commonly understood as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own need – is ecologically sound, economically viable, and socially just, and gender equality is prerequisite to it. Interdependent crises of food, fuel and climate – exacerbated by inequitable and fragile economies and social norms – need holistic attention and solutions. To that end, WEDO works to strengthen alliances between the women’s, environmental and development movements, across sectors, and across North and South.
 
Central to its overall vision, sustainable development has long been a cornerstone of WEDO’s mandate. Having been founded specifically to influence the 1992 Earth Summit (UNCED), WEDO has remained focused on strategic advocacy at critical global sustainable development fora, including at the Rio Conventions, the Commission on Sustainable Development, and Rio+20 and its follow-up, as well as national-level processes in several partner countries.
 
One of the most urgent issues on the global agenda, climate change remains a top priority for WEDO’s advocacy, capacity building, information sharing and other efforts to link gender equality and sustainable development.
 
 
WEDO works to ensure global governance is transparent, accountable and effective.
 
Since its founding, WEDO has believed in the potential of, and indeed the necessity for, good global governance. The United Nations has played – and still must play – a strong role in facilitating governments’ agreements and holding them accountable to their commitments. As a result of decades of multi-level, multi-stakeholder action, global legal frameworks for the promotion of human rights, gender equality and environmental sustainability exist. These frameworks provide tools for officials, practitioners and activists to draft and implement sustainable national-level policies, programs and practices. Focused on the interlinkages and interdependence of its priority issues, WEDO works to uphold existing legal frameworks and support governments, civil society partners and UN agencies alike in turning words into action.
 
Civil society access to and participation in global decision-making fora is a critical part of good global governance. From UN processes at headquarters, to meaningful engagement and partnership with country offices, WEDO supports information-sharing between and engagement of non-governmental voices. Visit the “Civil Society Participation” page for more on this work.

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Reports & Resources

Climate Change Connections: Gender & Population

A comprehensive resource kit from UNFPA and WEDO on gender, population and climate change. Learn how gender equality can reduce vulnerability to climate change impacts and how women are uniquely positioned to help curb the harmful consequences of a changing climate (2009).

2008 Annual Report: Building Alliances, Making Milestones

We invite you to imagine how the actions we take together bring us closer to our goal of a healthy and peaceful planet, social and economic justice and human rights for all.

Newsletter - WEDO News & Views


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Graduate Fellowships and Undergraduate Internships

Fellowship and internship applications (for graduate students and undergrads, respectively,) are accepted on a semester basis, reviewed in April, August and December and on a rolling basis when capacity permits . The duration of each fellowship/internship depends on the needs of the fellow/intern and WEDO programs. A minimum two-month commitment is required and applicants available for longer commitments are encouraged. Fellows/interns will conduct research and writing, provide administrative assistance, attend meetings, and undertake other tasks as necessary, under the direction of the relevant programmatic staff.


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New York Women's Foundation

At The New York Women’s Foundation®, we work together to transform the conditions of poverty and provide for economic security, advocate for anti-violence and safety issues, as well as health, sexual rights and reproductive justice all helping to build a city where women, families and communities thrive through shared power and sustained justice and security.

Our work is rooted in a tradition of educating and engaging women of all means about the power of our collective action as activist philanthropists. We know that we can have a greater impact when we work together, leveraging our financial and intellectual resources for individuals and families to empower themselves to affect long-term systemic change. It is this singular commitment of women helping women that sets The New York Women’s Foundation apart from more traditional philanthropic organizations locally and nationally.

Contact

39 Broadway
New York, NY 10006
Ph. 212-514-6993

http://www.nywf.org/
info@nywf.org


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Principal Staff

Ana L. Oliveira, President & Chief Executive Officer
Ph. (646) 564-5960
E-mail: aoliveira@nywf.org

Talatha Kiazolu-Reeves, Vice President of Operations and Strategic Learning
Ph. (646) 564-5962
E-mail: treeves@nywf.org

Jacqueline Ebanks, Vice President of Programs
Ph. (646) 564-5970
E-mail: jebanks@nywf.org

Ruth Sarlin, Vice President of Communications
Ph. (646) 564-5988
E-mail: rsarlin@nywf.org

Susan Fulwiler, Vice President of Development
Ph. (646) 564-5980
E-mail: sfulwiler@nywf.org
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Projects & Campaigns

 
The Foundation supports organizations and programs that are working to eradicate gender–based violence and create safe communities.

 
The Foundation supports organizations and programs that enable women and girls living at or below the poverty level to achieve and sustain economic security and advance economic justice through: Education, Employment, Work Supports, Training, and Asset Building.
 
 
The Foundation supports organizations and programs that recognize and promote health as a fundamental right and necessity for achieving and sustaining individuals’ complete mental, spiritual, political, economic, and social well–being.

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Reports & Resources

 
 
Provides an in-depth analysis of the economic security, health and safety, and well-being of women in the 59 community districts. It analyzes issues that shape the lives of women and girls, including poverty, income and employment; violence and safety; and education and health.
 
 
 
Gender Budget Analysis Reports
 
 
 


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Center News

Shirley Chisholm Center for Research on Women

The Shirley Chisholm Center for Research on Women embrace a twofold mission. First, it promotes research on women by initiating projects and programs on campus that supports the work of faculty, encourages student learning, and provides information and resources to the wider Brooklyn community. Second, it upholds and preserves the legacy of Shirley Chisholm, a distinguished alumna of Brooklyn College. With the help of an external bequest to the Women's Studies Program, the center will be founded as an affiliate to the academic program.
 
Women and gender (the social and historical meanings of the distinction between men and women) are fundamental categories of social, cultural and scientific inquiry integral to the study of the diversity of human experience. Consequently, the overarching goal of the center is to conduct research to develop original scholarship on gender and new questions promoting the growth of feminist inquiry and practice.

Principal Staff

Namita N. Manohar, Coordinator
Ph. (718) 951-5476 / (718) 951-5000, ext. 1439

Irva Adams, Office Staff
Ph. (7180 951-5476 / (718) 951-5000, ext. 1442
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The White House Project is a nonpartisan, nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organization that aims to advance women's leadership in all communities and sectors — up to the U.S. presidency — by filling the leadership pipeline with a richly diverse, critical mass of women.
 
Vote, Run, Lead is a dynamic program of The White House Project designed to engage women in the political process as voters, activists and candidates through trainings, inspiration and networking.
 
 
The Shirley Chisholm Project of Brooklyn Women's Activism is a repository of women's grassroots social activism in Brooklyn since 1945 and ongoing in the present.
 
In the spirit of Chisholm's legacy as a path-breaking community and political activist, the archive will also follow the many paths she pioneered by including materials representing the wide range of women's grassroots activism throughout the borough.

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Women's Studies Student Scholarship

The Women's Studies Program offers an Annual Women's Studies Student Scholarship to two outstanding women's studies majors.
 
The scholarship is an annual tuition award of $5,000 ($2,500 for the fall and $2,500 for the spring semester), paid out over the student's senior year at Brooklyn College.

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Women's Studies Program

The Program in Women's Studies at Duke University is dedicated to exploring gender identities, relations, practices, theories and institutions. In the field's first decades, feminist scholarship reoriented traditional disciplines toward the study of women and gender and developed new methodologies and critical vocabularies that have made interdisciplinarity a key feature of Women's Studies as an autonomous field. Today, scholars continue to explore the meaning and impact of identity as a primary though by no means transhistorical or universal way of organizing social life by pursuing an intersectional analysis of gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality. In the classroom, as in our research, our goal is to transform the university's organization of knowledge by reaching across the epistemological and methodological divisions of historical, political, philosophical, economic, representational, technological and scientific analysis.

Contact

210 East Duke Building
Durham , NC 27708
Ph. (919) 668-2548
Fx. (919) 684-4871
http://womenstudies.duke.edu
cfhharri@duke.edu


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Principal Staff

Ranjana Khanna, Program Director
Ph. (919) 668-2548
E-mail: rkhanna@duke.edu
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For the past few years, Duke Women's Studies has had a programming theme which has attached to it a fall grad and post grad seminar, a film series, and other events throughout the year. Last year the theme was "Future of the Feminist '70s" and the year before it was "The Question of Species" (focused on human/non-human connections). The theme for 2012-13 is Feminism and Freedom. Professor Frances Hasso will be teaching a graduate/post-graduate seminar on Feminism and Freedom that will be offered in Fall 2012.
 
We are interested to understand how some of the major interventions of the 1970's--for example, feminist art and film practices, marxist and radical feminism, eco-feminism, lesbian separatism, human and civil rights discourse, cold war divisions and non-aligned movements, and postcolonial internationalism---continue to have an impact on feminist thought, offer important interventions into contemporary questions, or map the futures of feminism. Throughout the year we will engage the The Future of the Feminist 1970s with a variety of events, projects and courses.
 
 
The 2010-11 annual theme is Animals and the Question of Species and will revolve around three major points: new theoretical formulations in continental philosophy around the question of human exceptionalism; the human/animal boundary and connection, and the ethics, politics, and advocacy that flow from those; and the role of gender in developing a greater understanding of nonhuman animals.
 
 
As many may know, a discourse emerged in the mid-1970's that aimed to investigate the connection between feminism and earth and animals. These women called themselves Eco-Feminists and generated many ideas about the nature of women, the plight of animals, and the need for conservation. Due to a whole host of theoretical and practical conflicts, this project was never seriously embraced by academic feminists. Duke Women's Studies New Eco-feminism project hopes to revisit these questions, and develop theories and methodologies that will resonate within academic feminism today. We learned from E2T that there is a great need for further study of conservation, land use, and animal advocacy, not just from the perspective of science but from the humanities and interpretive sciences as well. We believe that contemporary feminist theory has much to offer such an engagement. Despite the fact that our eco-feminist foremothers may have been entrenched in essentialist ideology in their formulations, we believe their questions were the right ones. What can feminist thinking offer in response to the many global crises we face today including massive development, deforestation, animal torture, extinction, habitat loss, pollution, and global warming? 

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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Graduate Employment Opportunities

Independent Study and the Moxie Project

The Moxie Project is a selective one-year experience at Duke University that combines academic, professional and applied learning experiences to foster leadership development undergraduates. Over the year, students will participate in a Course on Women and Leadership, an eight week NYC Summer Internship, and a Fall Capstone Seminar.  The Moxie Project is supported by DukeEngage. More information is available on the Moxie Project website.

 
Each fellowship carries a nine-month ~ $21,580 stipend (tuition and fees to be paid by the Graduate School). Please note that only students in years one through six are eligible for health insurance. Beginning in year seven, students are responsible for providing their own health insurance.

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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W
Member Organizations: 

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Daddy, can a man be Prime Minister?

By Gwendolyn Beetham*

When I was in graduate school in London, one of my professors told a cute story about his daughter, born during the Thatcher era, who as a small child had asked him whether a man could be Prime Minister. The point that my professor was trying to make was that having more women in positions of power does make a difference in how women’s roles are perceived by society at large.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action

By Karen O’Connor*

One need only look to the Declaration of Sentiments adopted by the women in attendance at the Seneca Falls Convention in August 1848 to begin to appreciate how far women in the United States still are from reaching equality in a host of arenas, many of which are dependent on political or legal equality. Although women were granted the franchise in 1920 after decades of struggle, it is only in the past few decades that women have become a political force – at least at the ballot box. Women not only vote more than men, but unmarried women and women of color are much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. In fact, women were key voters in the successful elections of Presidents Clinton and Obama.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Achieving Political Equality by Living It

By Tonni Brodber*

Linda Basch: From your perspective, what is the unfinished work of women’s political equality?

Tonni Brodber: In the English-speaking Caribbean women’s participation in political leadership ranges from a high of 13% in Jamaica to a low of 0% in Belize, with many countries like St. Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia hovering at 6.7% and at 5.6% respectively. In the face of such paltry numbers, it almost pains me to say that it is my belief that the unfuinished work of women’s political equality is the lack of quality and diversity.


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Center for Ethics in Action

The Center for Ethics in Action (CEIA) was created in 1996 to promote a new ethical compass for our country and the world beyond, with women leaders setting the course. The CEIA mounts exhibitions of fine art created by women around the world to demonstrate the importance of the arts in life-long learning as well as the transformative power of the arts. For the past seven years the CEIA has served as a fiscal sponsor for programs that fit within its vision and goals. The Maine Museum of Photographic Arts (MMPA) is a special program of CEIA. CEIA is a publicly supported U.S. non-governmental organization with its own tax-exempt status, located at the University of New England’s Portland, Maine campus.

Contact

716 Stevens Avenue
Portland, ME 04103
Ph. (207) 221-4499
Fx. (207) 523-1901
http://
azill@une.edu


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Principal Staff

Anne B. Zill, Founder & Director
Ph. (207) 221-4499
E-mail: azill@une.edu

Lois Barber,Co-Director
E-mail: loisbarber@sbcglobal.net

Martha Burk, Co-Director
E-mail: martha@marthaburk.org

Denise Froehlich, Co-Director

Kathleen D. Hendrix, Co-Director

Marjorie Lightman, Co-Director

Victoria Mares-Hershey, Co-Director

Elizabeth Moss, Co-Director
Ph. (207) 781-2620
E-mail: emoss@maine.rr.com

Katharine Sreedhar, Co-Director
E-mail: ksreedhar@uua.org

Mimi Wolford, Co-Director

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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Environment

Earth Charter Summit. On September 29, 2001, WCEIA convened a day-long Earth Charter Summit, one of twelve around the country that were linked together at two points during the day, with over 150 participants and 45 speakers, to build support for the Earth Charter document, which lays out 16 principles for a just, sustainable and peaceful global society.

Global Feminism

Gender Equality Commission Training. In June 2000, Croatian women leaders took part in this three week training, designed by Anne B. Zill and executed in Washington, D.C., New York (at the United Nations in conjunction with the Beijing + 5 proceedings) and in Maine. Participants were exposed to women leaders on the national, international and state levels in government, industry, academia and civil society.

In July 2001, Bulgarian women mayors were trained for two weeks in advocacy, coalition-building, issue development, and democracy in Maine and Washington, DC.

Other

Cuba: Hearts and Minds and Past and Present. 2007. An exhibition of historical and contemporary art by Cuban, Cuban-American and American Artists about the "Island."


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Reports & Resources

Annual Reports

Zill, Anne B. From Civil Society to Critical Mass: Women's Leadership , Global Security & Democracy in the 21st Century. 2002.

Consider the following list of values: consistency, inclusivity, inter-connectivity, collaboration, empathy, transparency, practicality, and long-term, big-picture considerations. How does the conduct of our government reflect these values? And what is to be done? This paper posits the proposition that the United States government is doing only fair to middling in these early days of the 21st century, that our democracy needs reinvigorating, renewed attention to these core values, as well as to the rule of law itself. A critical mass of women in positions of leadership in government and civil society could speed up this process.


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Center News

Institute for Research on Women

At the forefront of feminist research for over thirty years, the Institute for Research on Women (IRW) advances cutting-edge, interdisciplinary scholarship on gender, sexuality and women. Part of the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the IRW was founded in 1977 by faculty and administrators seeking to expand feminist scholarship and activism beyond the university’s fledgling Women’s Studies program. Today, the IRW supports a broad range of programming designed to stimulate research on gender, sexuality and women within and across the disciplines, throughout and beyond Rutgers. Promoting faculty and student connections and building intellectual community are also central to the IRW’s mission.

Contact

160 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. (732) 932-9072
Fx. (732) 932-0861
http://irw.rutgers.edu/
irw@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Ph.D., Director

Sarah Tobias, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: stobias@rci.rutgers.edu

Marlene Importico, Program Coordinator
E-mail: importic@rci.rutgers.edu

Yomaira Figueroa, IRW Learning Community Coordinator
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The IRW fosters feminist research at Rutgers through creative programming tied to an annual theme. The weekly Faculty/Graduate Seminar brings together faculty and advanced graduate students from a broad range of disciplines and from all three Rutgers campuses. Participants present works-in-progress, addressing the IRW’s annual theme from a range of disciplinary and methodological perspectives. The Distinguished Lecture Series presents innovative research by prominent feminist scholars and activists from Rutgers and other universities, exploring the annual theme in depth. The Undergraduate Learning Community extends the strengths of the IRW’s programs and research community to advanced undergraduate students who attend the IRW’s lecture series, develop research projects related to the annual theme, and work with IRW seminar fellows as mentors. Recent annual themes have included The Culture of Rights/The Rights of Culture (2008-9), Gendered Agency (2009-10) and The Art & Science of Happiness (2010-11).
 
In addition to its thematic programming, the IRW regularly organizes a one-to-three day Spring Colloquium addressing emergent debates in feminist activism and scholarship. Previous topics include the intersections of labor, class and sexuality; immigrant women’s collective organizing and the tensions between gender and disability studies.
 
Other regular programs include a workshop on Negotiating Basics for Women Entering the Academic Job Market, featuring women faculty of different ranks from the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and a Graduate Student Forum on Feminist Scholarship, enabling graduate students to share and receive feedback on their research.

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Reports & Resources

Books

Gender and Culture at the Limits of Rights, edited by Dorothy L. Hodgson (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), explores the concept of "women's rights as human rights” and the way in which a rights-based analysis can promote or limit the attainment of gender justice. Most of the essays in the volume were originally presented as part of the 2008-9 IRW seminar and its accompanying spring colloquium.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism, edited by Nancy Hewitt (Rutgers University Press, 2010) showcases a group of papers that were first presented at an IRW colloquium. The contributors "address issues of race, class and sexuality within histories of women's rights and feminism as well as the cultural and intellectual currents and social and political priorities that marked movements for women's advancement and liberation. The concept of waves surging and receding cannot fully capture these multiple and overlapping movements, chronologies, issues, and sites."

The papers collected in The Sex of Class: Women Transforming American Labor, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble (Cornell University Press, 2007), examines the role sex plays in the workforce, as well as contemporary and historical domestic and global labor movements. 

The Journal of International Labor and Working-Class History issued a special edition on “Working-Class Subjectivities and Sexualities” in Spring 2006. Edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble and Victoria Hattam, several of the articles in this volume were first presented as papers at spring colloquium organized by the IRW and ILWCH in 2004. 

Gendering Disability, edited by Bonnie G. Smith and Beth Hutchison (Rutgers University Press, 2004), collects work presented at a three-day IRW conference that brought together gender studies and disabilities studies scholars.

Feminist Locations: Local and Global, Theory and Practice edited by Marianne DeKoven (Rutgers University Press, 2001), is based on scholarship presented at the IRW from 1995 to 1998.

Transitions, Environments, Translations: Feminisms in International Politics edited by Joan W. Scott, Cora Kaplan, and Debra Keates (Routledge, 1997), from work presented at a conference jointly presented by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton and the IRW.

With the Women's Rights Litigation Clinic at Rutgers Law School-Newark, the IRW co-sponsored The Project on Reproductive Rights Laws for the 1990s which culminated in the 1989 Rutgers University Press volume Reproductive Laws for the 1990s, co-edited by Sherrill Cohen and Nadine Taub.

Describing the impetus for Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory and Writing By Black Women (Rugters University Press, 1989), Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English Cheryl Wall writes, “I took the idea for a one-day conference to then-IRW director Carol Smith, who embraced it enthusiastically. The conference on October 22-23, 1987, was one of the most gratifying experiences of my career. The room for the symposium was filled with many of the most brilliant scholars and writers of my generation. The book became one of the foundational texts in black feminist criticism. I will forever be grateful for the support of the IRW.”

Women, Households, and the Economy, edited by Lourdes Beneria and Catharine R. Stimpson (Rutgers University Press, 1987), collects papers presented at a two-day conference stemming from a grant from the Russell Sage Foundation “to bring together a group of scholars on the cutting edge of the thinking about women and the economy.”

Working Papers

Revised and condensed versions of work presented at our weekly seminar have been published in four volumes. Copies are available on request from the IRW. 
 
Femininities, Masculinities, and The Politics of Sexual Difference(s): Working Papers from the 2003-2004 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Beth Hutchison and Amanda B. Chaloupka
 
Reconfiguring Class and Gender: Working Papers from the 2002-2003 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Amanda B. Chaloupka, and Beth Hutchison
 
Modes of Knowledge and Action: Working Papers from the Women in the Public Sphere Seminar 1998-1999, edited by Beth Hutchison
 

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 Visiting Global Scholars

As part of its commitment to foster feminist research at Rutgers and beyond, the IRW hosts feminist researchers from around the world as visiting global scholars. Visiting global scholars are able to pursue their own research and writing in a supportive environment and access Rutgers’ unique feminist resources. They also participate in the IRW seminar, present public lectures to the university community and speak in classes and community forums.


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