Glass Ceilings & Barriers

Alternative Perspectives: a seat on the Board

Since Lord Davies’ independent review of women on boards a year ago (February 2011), the impetus to seek out female talent for the boardroom has never been greater. FTSE 100 companies appointed 26 women to their boards in the first eight months of 2011, a jump by 227% from the whole of 2010. Of these 26 appointments, 31% were women with financial services backgrounds, i.e. the most in-demand demographic.

This paper considers why women from the world of alternative investments could be appropriate for publicly quoted corporate boards. Working with senior members of 100 Women in Hedge Funds, we have conducted a study into the potential among women in alternatives for board. Of the 100 participants, 85% felt they were ready for a corporate board role within five years or less and 58% within two years or less.

URL: 
http://www.odgersberndtson.co.uk/gb/news-knowledge/knowledge-insight/article/alternative-perspectives-a-seat-on-the-board-4875/

Judith Robinson Rogers, President, Cottey College

Judy Robinson Rogers, Ph.D., became the eleventh president of Cottey College in 2004. Previously, she served as vice president for leadership and ethics at Georgetown College, Georgetown, Kentucky, and as associate vice president for academic affairs, undergraduate dean, and professor of English at Morehead State University, Morehead, Kentucky. In addition to general education English, Dr. Rogers taught undergraduate and graduate courses in modern and American literature. She received her undergraduate degree in English and speech/theatre from Centre College of Kentucky and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill which she attended as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow.

Lorna Edmundson, President Emerita, Wilson College

Lorna Duphiey Edmundson, Ed.D., President Emerita of Wilson College, is recognized as an effective leader, fundraiser, and facilitator of sustainable growth and change in higher education. Dr. Edmundson helps educational institutions build on their distinctions; strengthen finances and planning; create ethnic, racial and gender equity; encourage women and students of color to pursue the sciences; diversify and internationalize campuses; and forge international partnerships. She served as President of Wilson College from 2001-2011 and has held leadership roles at Columbia University, the American University of Paris, Marymount College, Trinity College, and Colby Sawyer College. Dr. Edmundson was honored with the Athena International Leadership Award, an Honorary Degree from Rhode Island College, and an Honorary, Lifetime Membership in Rotary International. She is featured among Asian and U.S. leaders in Women at the Top, by Cheung and Halpern.

Women in Banking

 Politicians and employers recognise that gender should be no barrier to career progression. Yet women continue to be under-represented at senior levels across the UK, particularly in the banking sector.

 
Research by the Institute of Leadership & Management, sponsored by RBS, investigates why so few women are promoted to senior management positions in banking and identifies the challenges they face. The report also propose solutions for the future.
URL: 
http://www.i-l-m.com/research-and-comment/womeninbanking.aspx

The Cranfield FTSE Female Index

 Since 1999, the annual Female FTSE benchmarking report has provided a regular measure of the number of women executive directors on the corporate boards of the UK's top 100 companies.

 
The Female FTSE Index is announced each year in November, and attracts considerable press attention in the UK and internationally. The study was hosted at the Chancellor of the Exchequer's offices at No. 11 Downing Street in 2004. Reports are available from 2001 onwards. The Index is incorporated in the Reports.
URL: 
http://www.som.cranfield.ac.uk/som/ftse

Government That Looks Like America? Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Financial Regulatory Institutions

 Diversity in executive management is low at all agencies when compared to the percentage of people of color in the civilian labor force. Three agencies—the Federal Reserve Banks of St. Louis, Boston, and Cleveland—have no people of color in executive management.

From the Greenlining Institute

URL: 
http://greenlining.org/publications/pdf/649/649.pdf
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