economic security

From the Women's Media Center: The Ground We Stand On

Earlier this month, the Women's Media Center featured an excellent "exclusive" written by Kenyan feminist and scholar Achola O. Pala.  Presenting a perspective too often unheard within women's activist communities, Pala argues that feminists from formerly colonized countries should look to their own cultural heritage for guideposts in creating greater justice in their communities.  Here are two gems to whet your appetite:


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Human Trafficking and the Media

By Courtney A. Fiske*


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Media Ignores the Importance of Housework in Divorce Rates and Career Advancement

By Londa Schiebinger and Lori Nishiura Mackenzie

ORIGINALLY POSTED MAY 23, 2010 ON THE HUFFINGTON POST

The Telegraph picked up a recently published London School of Economics research about housework. They were in lonely company. The piece did not see the light of day in the Financial Times, The New York Times or the Washington Post. Why not? Could it be that housework is not considered a serious topic?


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FAST FACT: Mother's Day Edition

By Kyla Bender-Baird

Women's eNews featured the following fast facts for Mother's Day in its weekly cheers and jeers column:

 


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Reconstructing Haiti with Women & Girls at the Center

By Tunisia L. Riley*

On May 4, 2010 I sat in a packed room of women (and a few men) coming together to raise awareness of women and girls efforts in the reconstruction of Haiti after the devastating January 12, 2010 earthquake and its aftershocks. While Haiti has subsided from the headlines of most mainstream media, this assembly of women, which included women from all parts of the African Diaspora, proves Haiti is still on our minds and in our hearts. But the major recurring question of the evening was, now what? What does this room, packed to capacity, full of progressively minded individuals do when we leave here? The forum, with its panel and audience sought to answer that.


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Questioning Success at NCRW's Corporate Leadership Summit

By Jacqueline Mumbey*

Last week, NCRW held a two-day corporate leadership summit (April 27-28) at Time Warner. It was an inspiring series of roundtables and explorations of the challenges and opportunities for retaining and advancing women of color in the corporate sector.


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“What?! Women still don’t get paid the same amount as men?!”

By Alicia Fiorino*

When I arrived at Baruch College for the Equal Pay Coalition’s Annual Forum, “The Time is Now: Forging a Stronger Economic Future for Women,” I asked an older security guard for directions to the event. He kindly gave me directions then asked, “What’s the forum all about?” I gladly responded, “Equal pay for women.” Shocked by my response, he said, “What?! Women still don’t get paid the same amount as men?!”


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What is "Class" Anyway?

By Kyla Bender-Baird

Throughout my education in sociology and women's studies as well as my activism within the non-profit realm, I have been taught to utilize an "intersectional" approach to research, advocacy, and politics. Which means always looking at race, class and gender and how they connect to each other.  Sometimes we'll expand intersectionality to look at other elements such as mental and physical ability, national origin, and sexual identity/orientation.  And while my awareness of the complexities and richness of race and gender has only expanded, when people bring up class, I basically stop and go "huh?!" Because, yes, intrinsically I know what class is and can point to it. But if asked for a definition, I'm completely at a loss.


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What does the financial crisis have to do with human rights?

This week Radhika Balakrishnan—the new Executive Director of the Center for Global Women’s Leadership—and James Heintz—co-author with Nancy Folbre of The Ultimate Field Guide to the U.S. Economy—asked the question, “What does the financial crisis have to do with human rights?” This question is refreshing amidst the endless, morbid data on just how bad the crisis is and how much people are suffering. The question offers a pathway to sustainable economic recovery by emphasizing the essential relationship between a government and its people.


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