STEM

Emilie and the Scientific Community

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

I am finished writing and thinking about socially conservative Texans (for now). But I still have history texts on the mind.

Here’s the dilemma: in a conversation with a like-minded male progressive, I was surprised to realize that, while sympathetic to the fact that girls have few female role models to read about in school, he didn’t see an obvious solution. He thought maybe a few more women could be highlighted, but he offered the following to explain why men would continue to outnumber women in the texts for years to come:


<< Back to the Full Blog

Q&A with Alice Domurat Dreger on Social Justice, Scholarship, and Women in STEM

Under the Microscope, an online space hosted by The Feminist Press "where women and science connect," just posted a fascinating conversation with Alice Domurat Dreger, a bioethicist and author who I know from her work on intersex activism.  Here's a snippet for your reading pleasure:

UtM: Are there any particular issues in bioethics you want to tackle or anything in particular you are working on now? 


<< Back to the Full Blog

Media Ignores the Importance of Housework in Divorce Rates and Career Advancement

By Londa Schiebinger and Lori Nishiura Mackenzie

ORIGINALLY POSTED MAY 23, 2010 ON THE HUFFINGTON POST

The Telegraph picked up a recently published London School of Economics research about housework. They were in lonely company. The piece did not see the light of day in the Financial Times, The New York Times or the Washington Post. Why not? Could it be that housework is not considered a serious topic?


<< Back to the Full Blog

FAST FACT: Women Continue to Lag in STEM Fields

By Kyla Bender-Baird

According to the recently released American Association for University Women (AAUW) report, Why So Few?, women continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields, especially at the upper levels. True, progress has been made, but women earn only 20% of bachelor's degrees in physics, engineering and computer science. So what's the hold up? AAUW's report delves into the social and environmental factors that contribute to the underrepresentation of women in STEM professions. As AAUW explains, "biological gender differences, yet to be well understood, may play a role, [but] are not the whole story." AAUW turns instead to societal beliefs, learning environments, and gender stereotypes to explain the persistant disparities. To learn more, click here.


<< Back to the Full Blog

Stanford researcher urges universities, businesses to offer benefit to pay for housework

January 20, 2010 posted by admin

Originally posted by Adam Gorlick January 19, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Londa Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.


<< Back to the Full Blog

A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


<< Back to the Full Blog

STEM Education Must Include Women, Says President Obama

November 30, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

This morning, I ran across a White House press release on a new STEM initiative the Obama administration is launching. According to the release, women and STEM are part of Obama’s three priorities for STEM education:


<< Back to the Full Blog

Front and Center: Women in Science, Environment and Technology

May 18, 2009 posted by admin


<< Back to the Full Blog

Science for Everyone

Adler Planetarium Oct 15, 2008 SCIENCE FOR EVERYONE By Veronica Arreola, Director of the Women in Science and Engineering program at the University of Illinois-Chicago


<< Back to the Full Blog

Syndicate content