women's leadership

Got Men?

By Joshua Ehrlich*

I am not a feminist. I’m just a guy who wants to help, and who believes strongly in what NCRW is doing. But without more male allies, we risk preaching to the converted and not advancing anything.

Do you invite men to networking meetings or talks about women’s leadership? If you’re like me, you get a notice about an interesting event like The Female Vision and you only think of women who might want to go. Why? We assume men won’t want to come, and that perpetuates the problem.


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Women and Leadership in America

By Shyama Venkateswar, Ph.D.*

I’m just back from a family vacation in India where I was struck by the healthy public debates and frequent news hour analyses on the current Women's Reservation Bill that would provide for 33% “reservations” (quotas) for women in parliament and local state assemblies. This is a part of Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s larger commitment to laws providing for gender equality in a country where millions of women and their families struggle to live on less than a $1 a day without regular access to food, water, housing, livelihoods, reproductive care or education.

Clearly, this is now a world-wide trend to bring more women into decision making positions in government and corporations. Norway, Spain, Netherlands have already passed legislation that would help to bring 30% to 40% women on corporate boards.


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Texas Scaredy-Cats

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

History is a collective story. It is selectively written, representing even unintended preferences of its author, and it is selectively understood, transforming as the mind of the reader practices a sort of cognitive dissonance to contextualize it.


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Generational Assignment

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

Someday, I want to be a politician or a policy wonk (this, in full nerdy self-disclosure). But when I look around, I dread being regarded as a heartless bitch (Hillary Clinton) or a bimbo (Sarah Palin) because I am visible or powerful.

The truth is, female role models are scarce. The woman most obviously responsible for cracking the political glass ceiling time and again is Hillary Clinton, and, whether she is cast as overly feminine or shockingly masculine, she remains powerful, well-known and female in the political world – not a small feat.


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NCRW Takes the Court

By Kyla Bender-Baird

Now, don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against sports. It’s just that I grew up in a family where the dinner conversation was more apt to involve a debate about the difference between jazz and blues music than a rundown of the latest Knicks or Lakers game. I am the person at the bar who always has to double-check what sport people are talking about when team names are being thrown around. And although I’m happy to join in the conversation, I may have to ask you first what an inning is before I can tell you what inning we are on.


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Youthful Reflections

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*


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Human Rights for Women and People with Disabilities

By Alexandra Mazzeo*

Yesterday, The Opportunity Agenda and the U.S. Human Rights Network hosted a telebriefing on two key human rights treaties and efforts toward U.S. ratification.


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Coming Together for Global Gender Equality

Jacki Zehner--former Goldman Sachs partner--mentioned the Council and our report Women in Fund Management on her blog yesterday:


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Gender Bias Affects the Bottom Line

In response to the Harvard Business Review blog posting, "Why Stock Price Drops When Women Join the Board," NCRW President Linda Basch submitted the following comment:


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CEDAW FORUM: Lighting a Fire for the Women’s Rights Treaty

By Allie Bohm*

As a colleague recently reminded me, our system of government was developed not to pass laws, but to make change slowly. Take, for example, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the international treaty dedicated to gender equality. Although the U.S. played a major role in drafting the treaty and signed it in 1980, it still has not been ratified by the Senate. We’re hoping to change that this year.


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