gender

FAST FACT: Immigrant women made up approximately 12 percent of all women in the United States in 2008

December 17, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The Migration Policy Institute just published a spotlight on immigrant women. It includes the latest data on labor force participation and socioeconomic status. Here’s a preview:

  • The 18.9 million immigrant women in the United States in 2008 made up approximately 12 percent of all women in the country.
  • While the majority of immigrant women had a high school degree or higher, they were less likely than immigrant men to have a bachelor's or advanced degree.
  • Nearly a third of immigrant female workers in fall 2009 were employed in service occupations

For many more stats as well as related articles, click here.

 


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News Coverage of the Veil and the Muslim Women's Movement

December 16, 2009 posted by admin

The Christian Science Monitor featured several articles this week on the veil and the Muslim Women's Movement. They're well worth the read! From "Behind the veil: Why Islam's most visible symbol is spreading:"


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Women Electricians Are Live Wires for a Labor Cause

December 15, 2009 posted by Francine Moccio*


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New Book on Women in the Trades by Jane LaTour

December 15, 2009 posted by admin


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Men Are Feminists, too!

December 9, 2009 posted by admin

Check out this post up on the fbomb by a young male feminist:

I am a feminist. You don’t have to be a woman and firsthand experience these inequalities in order to identify them. In fact, I find it irresponsible to identify these inequalities and then sit idly by and do nothing to change them.

Extra points to this activist for identifying as a cisgender man, being trans inclusive as well as just generally awesome.


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FAST FACT: Women and Poverty in the Nation's Capital

December 9, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The DC Women's Agenda, a program of Wider Opportunities for Women, recently released a gender analysis of the 2008 American Community Survey. They found that women remain in poverty even while working. Here are some of the stats they shared:

  • Women are eight times more likely to live in poverty than men in D.C.
  • Approximately 22% of women-headed households, working full or part time, live in poverty
  • Gender income disparities persist as men who worked full-time had an 8.5% increase in salary from 2007 to 2008 while their female counterparts had only a 2.3% increase.

To read the full report, click here.


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Where Do We Stand After 30 Years of CEDAW?

December 4, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Yesterday, three fabulous NCRW interns* and I journeyed down to the concrete maze that is the United Nations to participate in a commemorative event celebrating CEDAW’s 30th birthday. The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, often referred to as the international bill of women’s human rights, was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1979. The Convention defines discrimination as


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FAST FACT: Childbirth Deaths Exceed 2 Million Worldwide

December 2, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

A study released this fall reported some chilling trends:

  • More than 2 million babies and mothers die worldwide each year from childbirth complications, outnumbering child deaths from malaria and HIV/AIDS
  • About 42 percent of the world's 536,000 maternal deaths occur during childbirth

The research was led by the Save the Children Foundation, the Gates Foundation, and Johns Hopkins University.

This post is part of a forum


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Motherhood penalty remains a pervasive problem in the workplace

December 1, 2009 posted by Ruth Schechter

Originally posted November 22, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Mothers looking for employment are less likely to be hired, are offered lower salaries and are perceived as being less committed to a job than fathers or women without children, according to a recent study of gender inequality in the workplace. What’s more, the pay gap between mothers and childless women is actually bigger than the pay gap between women and men.


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