politics

The Economy Needs a Triple Hitter: Jobs, Safety Nets and Targeted Policies

Check out the latest from NCRW Senior Fellow and Executive Director of the Women of Color Policy Network at NYU Wagner, Nicole Mason:

According to the U.S. Census, there are enough new poor people in the U.S. to fill the New York Yankees Stadium more than six times over. And since the start of the recession in 2007, over six million have slipped into poverty--that's more than twice the size of the city of Chicago. This is not a simply a case of the poor sliding deeper into poverty, but of individuals straddling the line between middle class stability and poverty falling over the edge.


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Generational Assignment

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

Someday, I want to be a politician or a policy wonk (this, in full nerdy self-disclosure). But when I look around, I dread being regarded as a heartless bitch (Hillary Clinton) or a bimbo (Sarah Palin) because I am visible or powerful.

The truth is, female role models are scarce. The woman most obviously responsible for cracking the political glass ceiling time and again is Hillary Clinton, and, whether she is cast as overly feminine or shockingly masculine, she remains powerful, well-known and female in the political world – not a small feat.


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Youthful Reflections

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*


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Human Rights for Women and People with Disabilities

By Alexandra Mazzeo*

Yesterday, The Opportunity Agenda and the U.S. Human Rights Network hosted a telebriefing on two key human rights treaties and efforts toward U.S. ratification.


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What is the Government Doing for Preventive Care?

In this video, Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius answers questions on how the Affordable Care Act will increase access to preventive services, especially for women and families.  Sebelius is joined by actress and author Fran Drescher and Donna Norton, National Campaign Director of MomsRising ,who shares questions from MomsRising members:

(Thanks, MomsRising, for bringing this video to our attention!)

 


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FAST FACT: A New Way to Rank Women’s Economic Opportunity

By Kyla Bender-Baird

Last week, the Economic Intelligence Unit (EIU) launched a new global index and ranking of women’s economic opportunity. The pilot report builds on the United Nations Development Programme’s Gender-Related Development Index and the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Index. According to EIU,


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CEDAW FORUM: Strengthening Our Global Voice

By June Zeitlin*

Women’s rights are human rights, and human rights are women’s rights. This is the mantra of CEDAW, the most comprehensive women’s human rights treaty that the US has yet to ratify. The reasons to ratify CEDAW here in the U.S. are clear. Not only will ratification strengthen our global voice to stand up for women and girls around the world, but ratification of CEDAW would also benefit women here in the United States.

You may be asking the question, why now? Do we really think—given the increased polarization and partisan tensions--that we can get two-thirds of the Senate (67 Senators) to ratify CEDAW? I don’t dispute that it is a challenge, but we absolutely believe it is possible. Here are two reasons why:


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CEDAW FORUM: Lighting a Fire for the Women’s Rights Treaty

By Allie Bohm*

As a colleague recently reminded me, our system of government was developed not to pass laws, but to make change slowly. Take, for example, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the international treaty dedicated to gender equality. Although the U.S. played a major role in drafting the treaty and signed it in 1980, it still has not been ratified by the Senate. We’re hoping to change that this year.


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CEDAW FORUM: There’s No Time Like the Present

The United States remains one of only seven countries that have not ratified CEDAW (the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women).  CEDAW is an international agreement on basic human rights for women and the most broadly endorsed human rights treaty within the United Nations, having been ratified by over 90% of UN member states. CEDAW outlines human rights such as the right to live free from violence, the ability to go to school, and access to the political system.


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CEDAW FORUM: The U.S. Needs a Human Rights Treaty for Women Domestically

By Margot Baruch* 

Before CEDAW there was no international legal mechanism in place that called on states to assess gender inequalities in their country. The Convention draws attention to 30 articles that deal with discrimination on the basis of being a woman. The treaty is divided into six parts - all related to ensuring that women are able to enjoy their “fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,” as stated in the preamble of the UDHR [Universal Declaration of Human Rights].  


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