politics

CEDAW FORUM: The Unfinished Business of Ratification

By Linda Tarr-Whelan*

NCRW asked leading research and policy expert Linda Tarr-Whelan to weigh in on the status of CEDAW. In addition to her responses, below is an excerpt from a previously published commentary from Linda featured on Women’s eNEws and The Huffington Post.

On Dec. 18, 1979, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, or CEDAW, making it a watershed day for women around the globe.

In those heady days, I was deputy assistant to President Jimmy Carter for women's concerns. We expected speedy action after he sent the treaty to the Senate.


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CEDAW Forum: Time to Make History With CEDAW

By Don Kraus*

The bumper sticker on my wife’s car reads, “Well-behaved women seldom make history!” I believe proponents of CEDAW, the Women’s Treaty, have been minding their manners a bit too much. CEDAW is the most important international mechanism for women’s equality, and provides a universal standard for women’s human rights. The treaty is a basic framework for ending violence against women, ensuring girls access to education, and promoting economic opportunity and political participation for women.


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Wealth to Health: How it’s All Connected

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

Earlier this week, my fellow intern, Courtney Fiske, reported on the findings released last month by the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University, which revealed a widening racial wealth gap between whites and blacks in the United States.


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Ms. Foundation Hosts Successful Capitol Hill Briefing on the Recession

Last week, the Ms. Foundation for Women--in partnership with the Center for Community Change and Lake Research Partners--hosted a successful Capitol Hill briefing, sharing results from their recent poll on the impact of the recession on women.  According to Gail Cohen from the Joint Economic Committee,

only in May did women gain almost the same number of jobs as men -- but only in temporary Census jobs. In the private sector in May, women lost 1000 jobs while men gained 42,000 jobs.

To learn more about the briefing and download results of the poll, visit the Ms. Foundation's blog, Igniting Change.

 

 


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Planned Parenthood Explains Health Care Reform

Over the past year, there has been so much back and forth on what health care reform should be and how it would impact women, that by the time reform was signed into law, what it actually meant was less than clear.  Fortunately, Planned Parenthood has produced a video, with the help of actress Julianne Moore, explaining what health care reform means for women:

 


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Can You Hear (or Read) Me Now?

Originally posted by Rylee Sommers-Flagan June 24, 2010 on EmoryWheel,com (Emory University's student newspaper)

I’ve long been suspicious that editorialists and editorial boards, despite purporting to speak on behalf of their audiences, are not demographically representative of the larger population. These suspicions were confirmed for me last week in a workshop with a group called the OpEd Project.

According to several studies, men dominate something called “thought leadership” in the United States. Specifically, male voices make up about 85 percent of those present in the national editorial conversation. They supply the perspective in opinion media, vastly outnumbering female representation in talk shows, expert interviews, and op-ed pieces across our country.


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Bridging the Racial Wealth Gap

By Courtney A. Fiske*

The gap between the personal wealth of white and black Americans undergirds socioeconomic inequality in the United States. What’s more, it’s widening.

This fact served as the springboard for an online seminar hosted last Thursday by the Insight Center for Community Economic Development. Entitled “Social Security at 75,” the discussion probed the intersections between race, wealth (defined as earnings minus expenditures), and economic security.


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Enough talk - let's walk the walk

By Chloe Angyal*

As ethnic tension boils over into violence in Kyrgyzstan this week, rumors have begun to surface on the ground that amid the rioting, shooting and chaos, Kyrgyz women are being raped. Whether or not the rumor is true, the situation is all too familiar. When violence breaks out, women and girls, already vulnerable, are often among the first casualties, and the violence is often systematic, designed to demoralize their communities.


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