diversity

Emilie and the Scientific Community

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

I am finished writing and thinking about socially conservative Texans (for now). But I still have history texts on the mind.

Here’s the dilemma: in a conversation with a like-minded male progressive, I was surprised to realize that, while sympathetic to the fact that girls have few female role models to read about in school, he didn’t see an obvious solution. He thought maybe a few more women could be highlighted, but he offered the following to explain why men would continue to outnumber women in the texts for years to come:


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CEDAW FORUM: Lighting a Fire for the Women’s Rights Treaty

By Allie Bohm*

As a colleague recently reminded me, our system of government was developed not to pass laws, but to make change slowly. Take, for example, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the international treaty dedicated to gender equality. Although the U.S. played a major role in drafting the treaty and signed it in 1980, it still has not been ratified by the Senate. We’re hoping to change that this year.


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FAST FACT: Black Women's Health Care Access and Educational Attainment Rising

By Josephina Ragon* 

Last week, I waited eagerly on the steps of City Hall to get the latest facts on the status of black women and girls. The Law and Policy Group, Inc. released their 2010 Bi-Annual report to a crowd of fellow non-profits, media, and interested citizens. According to Executive Director and Founder Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, the report gives the public a picture of an “African-American female as a whole person—a snapshot of her life.” This particular study is the only ongoing national report on the current state of black females in the United States.

The research not only covers the challenges faced by black women today, but also their achievements thus far. For example,


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Wealth to Health: How it’s All Connected

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

Earlier this week, my fellow intern, Courtney Fiske, reported on the findings released last month by the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University, which revealed a widening racial wealth gap between whites and blacks in the United States.


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From the Women's Media Center: The Ground We Stand On

Earlier this month, the Women's Media Center featured an excellent "exclusive" written by Kenyan feminist and scholar Achola O. Pala.  Presenting a perspective too often unheard within women's activist communities, Pala argues that feminists from formerly colonized countries should look to their own cultural heritage for guideposts in creating greater justice in their communities.  Here are two gems to whet your appetite:


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New York Domestic Workers Bill of Rights Takes One Giant Step Forward

This week, New York moved one step closer to becoming the first state to enact a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. Here's what the Ms. Foundation has to say about it:

The bill, which would guarantee domestic workers basic workplace rights like paid vacation and sick days, overtime pay, and at least one day off per week, was passed by the New York State Senate by a vote of 33-28. Though the legislation still has to be reconciled with an earlier version that was passed by the Assembly last year, and then signed into law by Governor Paterson, yesterday's vote in the bill's favor was a historic achievement, setting the stage for the passage of similar bills in states like California and Colorado.


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Happy Pride Month!

By Kyla Bender-Baird

Every year, LGBT folk around the world come together to celebrate their queerness for Pride month--June.  Along with the parties, festivals, parades, and even an occasional social justice march, Pride offers our community an opportunity to reevaluate where we are headed as movement (or even question whether there is one movement or several).  Late last week, President Obama issued his annual Proclamation for LGBT Pride month.  In it he says,


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Voices of Asian American LGBT Immigrants in Immigration Reform

By Tunisia L. Riley*

Assembled together on a cold New York day I sat in a room overlooking the frigid Manhattan skyline. Yet, while New York City (even in the summer time) is cold to me, to others who have been ostracized by their native countries and families for their sexual orientation, New York City can become home, and a safe haven.

On May 11, 2010, I sat in on a Press Conference for “The Voices of Asian American LGBT Immigrants in Immigration Reform.” The event was sponsored by a collective of organizations under the umbrella of The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) Speakers were presently and formerly undocumented, Asian and Pacific Islanders of the LGBTQ Community who found solace in the United States but more specifically New York City.


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Questioning Success at NCRW's Corporate Leadership Summit

By Jacqueline Mumbey*

Last week, NCRW held a two-day corporate leadership summit (April 27-28) at Time Warner. It was an inspiring series of roundtables and explorations of the challenges and opportunities for retaining and advancing women of color in the corporate sector.


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