girls

Girls Inc Scholars Take It to the White House

By Kyla Bender-Baird

I have to admit, when I was a kid, I was convinced that I would be the first woman President of the United States.  Eventually, I abandoned that career goal but to this day am still a bit of a politics nerd.  Well, it's nice to see that the next generation of girl leaders are getting a jumpstart on civic engagement thanks to Girls IncEarlier this month, four Girls Inc National Scholars met with the First Lady's staff to discuss barriers to physical activities for girls across the U.S. Click here to view videos of the girls talking about this amazing experience.


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Map It! The Global Status of Girls

Introducing the new, fully interactive method of feminist geographical mapping: online map tools!


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The Myth of "Stranger Danger"

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. A major function of awareness raising is debunking long-held myths, including so-called "stranger danger." In a recent blog post, the Ms. Foundation tackled the misnomer that the majority of violence is perpetrated by strangers. In reality, according to research released by the Child Abuse Research Education and Service Institute at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 85% of child abuse is perpetrated by a relative or other individual the child knows. Click here to read the rest of the blog post and to learn about the Ms.


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FAST FACT: The Next Generation of Voters Are Taking their Civic Duty Seriously

By Kyla Bender-Baird

84% of 7th-12th graders say they intend to vote in every election (up from 77% two decades ago), according to a report from the Girl Scouts Research Institute. Good Intentions: The Beliefs and Values of Teens and Tweens Today says that


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NCRW Network Promotes the Voices and Concerns of Girls

The National Council for Research on Women harnesses the resources of its network to ensure fully informed debate, policies, and practices to build a more inclusive and equitable world for women and girls. And we take that last part seriously. Girls cannot be left out of the equation. They are an important part of our movement for social change. As Chris Grumm, President and CEO of the Women’s Funding Network, recently said at NCRW’s afternoon program, the bifurcation between women and girls in our movement is unhelpful, dangerous, and may be holding us back. Recent research and advocacy by our member centers clearly demonstrates the importance of keeping girl’s voices and concerns front and center.


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Girls Rock the House

Posted by admin

Today we learned about this newly launched national initiative that "seeks to educate and build the self-esteem of middle school girls to increase their knowledge of the political process and encourage future political involvement." It’s called Girls Rock the House:

 


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Tradeswomen Organizing for Change: 30 Years and Counting

May 25, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

As the granddaughter of a woman engineer (and also someone who struggles to assemble her Ikea furniture but loves her new toolkit anyway), it was an honor to be surrounded by tradeswomen at the Institute for Women and Work’s panel last Thursday night up at Cornell.  We were gathered to discuss how the economic crisis and recovery efforts in New York impact women, particularly tradeswomen.  For me, though, it was an education in a history I didn’t even know existed: the history of tradeswomen in the U.S. and their fight for recognition and rights.  After 30 years of activism, women still only comprise 3% of the construction labor force.   As one panelist said, “do we really believe that men have 97% of the answers?”  I think not. Although frustration with this slow-moving progress was evident in the room, the Cornell event was more celebratory than anything else. Susan Eisenberg shared slides from her multi-media installation, On Equal Terms.   The theme of the installation: Women in construction—30 years and still organizing.  The most provocative exhibit was the bathroom shack, literally a 6 foot by 6 foot plywood replica of a typical bathroom tradeswoman encounter on the job, complete with documented misogynistic and explicitly sexual graffiti. 


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New Strategies for Leadership

May 11, 2009 posted by admin

One of the many dynamic panels to be featured at our upcoming annual conference , Igniting Change: Activating Alliances for Social Justice, will feature top scholars and activists taking apart the challenges of building pipelines of leadership for young girls and boys.  At the end of the session, we hope to offer new strategies for collaborating with youth as we discover new definitions of leadership and feminism. 


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FAST FACT: For Young Black Girls in NYC, Safety is of Prime Concern

April 24, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird 60% of young black girls in New York City surveyed by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research indicated they worry about their personal safety.  89% attributed their concern to frequent fights at school. Despite this and other harsh realities, the study reveals the strength and resilience girls embody.  Produced by IWPR and The Black Women for Black Girls Giving Circle, Black Girls in New York City: Untold Strength and Resilience documents the lives of girls living in New York City.  The report discusses the daily challenges girls face as well as their modes of survival.  To read the whole report, click here.


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