Care-giving

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FAST FACT: Mother's Day Edition

By Kyla Bender-Baird

Women's eNews featured the following fast facts for Mother's Day in its weekly cheers and jeers column:

 


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Mother's Day Videos--They're all the Rage!

In preparation for the upcoming holiday--Mum's Day--many women's organizations have produced videos to celebrate the diverse voices and stories of mommies.  Check these out!

Tell Your Story with the Women's Media Center:

What did your mother teach you about reprodutive health? (from the Center for Reproductive Rights):

 


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FAST FACT: The rich get richer…

January 25, 2010 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Ever since my sophomore year of college, when I took “Social, Class, and Power,” I’ve had the refrain “the rich get richer while the poor get poorer” stuck in my head. Today’s report released by the Center for American Progress and Center for WorkLife Law at Hastings College of Law gave me the facts behind this refrain.

Since 1979, the median annual income of the bottom third of American families has decreased by 29% while the top third experienced a 7% increase in their median income. The middle third’s median annual income decreased 13%.


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FAST FACT: One-Third of U.S. Adults are Care-Givers

December 11, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Nearly one-third of U.S. adults play caregiver roles in households across the nation according to Caregiving in the U.S. 2009 report. The report was funded by the MetLife Foundation and conducted for the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP by Matthew Greenwald & Associates. The report also found that

  • Caregivers provide an average of 20 hours a week of care
  • 66% of caregivers are women
  • One in seven caregivers provides care for a child with special needs
  • One in six caregivers report that caregiving has a negative impact on their health

To read the entire report, click here.


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A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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FAST FACT: Motherhood by the Numbers

May 7, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird In honor of Mother’s Day, the Census Bureau released a handy-dandy fact sheet on motherhood.  Here are some of the stats they compiled:


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FAST FACT: Changing Things Up—Gender Dynamics at Work and at Home

April 3, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird The Families and Work Institute  recently released a fascinating report on the changing gender dynamics in the home and workplace.  What they found is quite exciting:


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Love in the Time of Layoff: Her Expendable Career

April 1, 2009 posted by Deborah Siegel Deborah Siegel is the author of Sisterhood, Interrupted: From Radical Women to Grrls Gone Wild, creator of the group blog Girl w/Pen and a long-time friend of the Council.  The following was originally posted on Recession Wire as Deborah's latest installment of her weekly column, Love in the Time of Layoff. Those who read this column know that I’ve been writing very personally about how the downturn has affected my relationship. In all honesty, I’m starting to fear that by focusing on what’s happening inside relationships, we may be losing sight of larger contexts—what could and should be happening in the structures that govern our lives. The personal is political, after all! Whoever invented the notion that a wife who earns less than her husband has a career that is, by definition, “expendable”? The ubiquity of this sentence—“she has an expendable career”—was brought home to me once again when I read Diane Clehane’s “Recession Marriage Wars” in yesterday’s Daily Beast. Clehane poignantly shares her frustration that for her, and for many working mothers she knows, “The recession means wives are under pressure from their husbands who tell them a sitter is now a luxury they can’t afford.” These are working mothers, mind you—women who have defined themselves by their careers for most of their lives and who know that being a good mom and having a great career are not mutually exclusive. As someone with big hopes of starting a family, and as a feminist, I’m thinking government-funded or employer-subsidized childcare is sounding like a pretty darn good idea right about now.


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